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Josh Allen is the best personality in the NFL


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6 hours ago, machine gun kelly said:

There’s no excuses for Josh’s comments in high school, but it was high school.  I don’t know the reference and how he made what comments.  What I do know is how much I drum into my kids who are all young adults now to stay true hell off social media.

 

People laugh at me, but I’m not on as BB says Snap Insta whatever or even Facebook.  I have a LinkedIn acct for work, and if you want to reach me, call, text or email me.  Keeps me out of trouble even though making comments like referenced would never come out of my mouth.

 

Ethan, not sure the motivations here, but Josh is a godsend for Buffalo and the Bills.

 

Same. I don't have the facebook, or the twitters. I have never snapped or tick tocked. I don't even have a LinkedIn. I do have an insta but I have never posted, it is used entirely for following NFL accounts. 

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@Ethan in Portland I wonder how we would all look if our teenage lives were exposed.  Christ, man.  Josh Allen is one of the best NFL role models I’ve ever seen.  It’s odd you felt the need to muddy this thread by “warning” us.

 

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7 hours ago, Ethan in Portland said:

100% agree. And to his credit, Josh never used youth excuse. He simply said I'm sorry and has done nothing but be a stand up guy ever since. 


First of all, he definitely DID cite his age as the culprit. He also admitted it was dumb and took responsibility (didn’t try to make it out to be an ok thing to do or lie and say he was hacked or a friend did it).

 

Also, not all of those were rap lyrics. Josh used the n word as if he were in regular conversation. Now imo Josh Allen is clearly not racist. I, for one, care mostly about the intent of a comment or quote rather than the comment or quote itself.


Now with that said, simply saying somebody was “only” quoting a TV show or entertainer…as if that absolves them of any responsibility, doesn’t make it ok. What does make it ok is when there was zero malice behind it.


Considering everything I’ve learned about Josh and his upbringing…he wasnt being racist with any of it. From how I read it, the “if it ain’t white it ain’t right” comment was in response to somebody asking Josh “why is he so white?” Now, especially if that question was asked by a black person, the clap back was perfect. A fitting quote from a tv show and we know how Josh likes to quote movies and tv shows. It’s basically smack talk and a retort to a question that was racially motivated but I’m sure not in a racist way. He used a tv show quote as a clap back and It doesn’t offend me at all.
 

And let’s face it…almost all white kids, rural or urban, who like rap, quote the n word. Most only exclusively verbally or direct messaging, not publicly posting it…definitely a stupid move by a kid thinking only his twitter followers would ever see it. But there are PLENTY video of white kids calling each other the n word in general conversation …NOT CAUSE THEYRE RACIST….actually the opposite. They think it’s cool, they like black culture and are emulating it. It’s not coming from any place of hate.
 

In conclusion, while I don’t condone white people using the n word, I don’t count is as automatically racist if they do. You have to consider who the person is and the context. Hip hop culture has had a huge influence on millions of white kids of different age groups…you can’t be influential and expect not to be emulated. The n word is part of the culture and we (my fellow black people) have created the culture and allowed that word to remain active so this is what comes along with it. So until we start getting offended by our own people using the words in music, we can’t be offended by the people who made it as big as it is (white people) quoting the lyrics and wanting to talk to each other how black people do in hip hop culture movies.

 

Just my take.

Edited by StHustle
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2 hours ago, GunnerBill said:

 

Same. I don't have the facebook, or the twitters. I have never snapped or tick tocked. I don't even have a LinkedIn. I do have an insta but I have never posted, it is used entirely for following NFL accounts. 

Yep GB, can’t get a comment misconstrued if you’re not on all of these social media venues.  How many stupid comments has an NFL player had to walk back as they didn’t think how it could be perceived by others.

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9 hours ago, Ethan in Portland said:

Josh seems like a great guy. But be careful of hero worship for people we really don't know. This is the same guy that tweeted at a young age "If it ain't white, it ain't right." To his credit he owned up to the offensive tweets. He has done nothing in Buffalo but be a model citizen and near perfect face of the franchise.  

There ya go.  If only everyone knew of the dumb stuff you and we all said as teenagers.

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1 hour ago, StHustle said:

 

 

Also, not all of those were rap lyrics. Josh used the n word as if he were in regular conversation. Now imo Josh Allen is clearly not racist. I, for one, care mostly about the intent of a comment or quote rather than the comment or quote itself.

 

Please give an example of Josh using the n word as if he were in regular conversation. From my understanding he was stupidly quoting rap lyrics as a teenager, was appropriately called out on it, then took responsibility and apologized. 

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27 minutes ago, RunTheBall said:

 

Please give an example of Josh using the n word as if he were in regular conversation. From my understanding he was stupidly quoting rap lyrics as a teenager, was appropriately called out on it, then took responsibility and apologized. 


I mean I’m pretty sure “Bout to show up these N*ggas at pong” was never rap lyrics…lol

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1 hour ago, StHustle said:


First of all, he definitely DID cite his age as the culprit. He also admitted it was dumb and took responsibility (didn’t try to make it out to be an ok thing to do or lie and say he was hacked or a friend did it).

 

Also, not all of those were rap lyrics. Josh used the n word as if he were in regular conversation. Now imo Josh Allen is clearly not racist. I, for one, care mostly about the intent of a comment or quote rather than the comment or quote itself.


Now with that said, simply saying somebody was “only” quoting a TV show or entertainer…as if that absolves them of any responsibility, doesn’t make it ok. What does make it ok is when there was zero malice behind it.


Considering everything I’ve learned about Josh and his upbringing…he wasnt being racist with any of it. From how I read it, the “if it ain’t white it ain’t right” comment was in response to somebody asking Josh “why is he so white?” Now, especially if that question was asked by a black person, the clap back was perfect. A fitting quote from a tv show and we know how Josh likes to quote movies and tv shows. It’s basically smack talk and a retort to a question that was racially motivated but I’m sure not in a racist way. He used a tv show quote as a clap back and It doesn’t offend me at all.
 

And let’s face it…almost all white kids, rural or urban, who like rap, quote the n word. Most only exclusively verbally or direct messaging, not publicly posting it…definitely a stupid move by a kid thinking only his twitter followers would ever see it. But there are PLENTY video of white kids calling each other the n word in general conversation …NOT CAUSE THEYRE RACIST….actually the opposite. They think it’s cool, they like black culture and are emulating it. It’s not coming from any place of hate.
 

In conclusion, while I don’t condone white people using the n word, I don’t count is as automatically racist if they do. You have to consider who the person is and the context. Hip hop culture has had a huge influence on millions of white kids of different age groups…you can’t be influential and expect not to be emulated. The n word is part of the culture and we (my fellow black people) have created the culture and allowed that word to remain active so this is what comes along with it. So until we start getting offended by our own people using the words in music, we can’t be offended by the people who made it as big as it is (white people) quoting the lyrics and wanting to talk to each other how black people do in hip hop culture movies.

 

Just my take.

 

the funny thing to me in all of this is how rapid and how forced changes in social mores have been wrt no no words (and much more than that, who can say them and how).

 

if we look at what some currently really woke people did on television or much more frequently posted on social media just a few years ago vs what they themselves get outraged about, it's not hard to imagine things that people are totally ok with now being looked at in just a few years as repugnant. For example, jimmy kimmel and sarah silverman both did sketches for comedic effect where they wore blackface on television.  when they did this, it was a bit edgy but no one was getting cancelled over it.  in the early days of twitter, lots of currently lefty/woke comedians/activists were posting n bombs and racial/edgy jokes.  quoting lyrics from rap (which have heavy profanity, violent sexist homophobic and politically incorrect themes, and are carpeted with n bombs) didn't seem to be a big deal then (i say that meaning that popular people posted this stuff and nothing came of it, at least for some time).  this does go beyond race stuff (like when kevin heart got booted from some award show because he tweeted a joke about not being happy if his son was homosexual years before.  ironically, he's made many much more insensitive jokes of that nature in his act which has propelled him to super stardom, but i suppose it's too much work to watch his stuff and clip it to cancel him vs a tweet).

 

an example of what happens today which i think might result in some people saying "i was young, that behavior is reprehensible and i've learned from it" and is along the lines of what Josh did -- most of the short videos i see on instagram (many of which originate on tic tok) have rap music played over the video.  the videos are often enough of non black people (most of the stuff on my intan feed is fight training and exercise/fitness stuff and it's just full of short videos set to music).  Right now, no one has any issue with this, but i could see some woke think piece getting written up about how this is cultural appropriation and racist and exploitative, and then selective witch hunts would come about and cancel people just as they have for the prior posts mentioned above.  it's also rich that many people would be totally outraged about a teenage Josh quoting rap lyrics or some PG television show word for word, but think nothing of a same aged kid today posting some video set to the same rap lyrics.

 

whats ironic to me in all of this is that with this newfound moral outrage, we still have worse and worse public behavior.  people use more profanity, display more overt sexuality and in general act less civilly -- especially on social media.  i look at the world and think i've officially become an old man pining for the old days.  

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Nuance of race relations, social media, language and context is difficult for adults to manage.  I do not expect teenagers to have a grasp of it.  The use of that word amongst peer group white youths to refer to each other is odd to me, but it's likely a cultural influence of things other than outright racism.  I do not listen to rap, but the context of the lyrics is a likely source.  At some point, most of us see a day when we wish we could share some words of wisdom with our dumbass 15 year old selves.  

 

Here's a thought I have often had.  Who released those Tweets just prior to the 2018 draft?  The timing of it makes me think it is either (1) an agent hoping to drive his QB further up in the draft or (2) a team that was hoping for Allen to fall further down the board where they might have a shot at him which would make the Bills among the list of suspects.  It would be some real Machiavellian, 3D chess to which no team would wish to admit.  If it was just a random person who knew Josh and had some grudge against him I doubt they would have waited until the eve of the draft.

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1 minute ago, JESSEFEFFER said:

Nuance of race relations, social media, language and context is difficult for adults to manage.  I do not expect teenagers to have a grasp of it.  The use of that word amongst peer group white youths to refer to each other is odd to me, but it's likely a cultural influence of things other than outright racism.  I do not listen to rap, but the context of the lyrics is a likely source.  At some point, most of us see a day when we wish we could share some words of wisdom with our dumbass 15 year old selves.  

 

Here's a thought I have often had.  Who released those Tweets just prior to the 2018 draft?  The timing of it makes me think it is either (1) an agent hoping to drive his QB further up in the draft or (2) a team that was hoping for Allen to fall further down the board where they might have a shot at him which would make the Bills among the list of suspects.  It would be some real Machiavellian, 3D chess to which no team would wish to admit.  If it was just a random person who knew Josh and had some grudge against him I doubt they would have waited until the eve of the draft.

 

iirc, josh had some group scrub his social media prior to the draft and they didn't have an issue w anything (or they had some stuff deleted but some of the tweets that got him in trouble weren't on the problem list or some such).

 

the more i see on this kind of stuff the more convinced i am that what is done/said is not as important as what is said/done by who to whom.

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11 hours ago, Success said:

One thing I've noticed on twitter & around message boards is the general sentiment of "I don't like the Bills, but I really like Josh Allen..."

 

 


a few of my college-aged nephews are not Bills fans, but they have Josh Allen jerseys. 
 

I think this newer generation of fans too is more player focused than team focused. 

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2 minutes ago, colin said:

 

iirc, josh had some group scrub his social media prior to the draft and they didn't have an issue w anything (or they had some stuff deleted but some of the tweets that got him in trouble weren't on the problem list or some such).

 

the more i see on this kind of stuff the more convinced i am that what is done/said is not as important as what is said/done by who to whom.

 

Two older, white men nodding in agreement.  Context always matters but is seldom sought.

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10 hours ago, TBBills said:

Of course Ethan had to ruin what could have been a nice thread.

Agree.  This thread is off the rails.  
 

We live in the era were many people use social media to scrutinize everyone and everything.  Full context is often ignored.   Hopefully these practices stop in generations to come.  No one is perfect.  Everyone learns from their past experiences.  Some actually put their learning into practice and some do not.  

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9 hours ago, Doc Brown said:

He was a young teenager quoting a tv show but unfortunately that story will stick with him the rest of his life no matter what he does.  Dominique Foxworthy (an ESPN analyst) reminded us of that in his December 2020 quote saying there's a part of him that gets happy when Josh does something dumb because of those tweets.

And if this is true, I'd say he is unaware of the context in which the tweets were based and made.

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