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Kim Pegula is receiving medical care


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40 minutes ago, NyQuil said:

I do wonder if it was grave if Jessie would have pulled out of Wimbledon.

 

While I hope that is true, she pulled out of Rothesay without any statement. She is on the entry but the draw isn't out for Wimbledon so we don't really know. Since she didn't play this last tournament without notice or statement I wouldn't be shocked if she did the same for Wimbledon; especially given the messaging from the family a week or so ago.

 

The statement from the Pegula's came pretty close to Serena's last minute WC bid. I speculated that that was because Jessica probably gave notice that she may not be playing in Wimbledon and that Serena was possibly taking her spot. The family was getting ahead of any news that might have made. She is the 8th ranked player in the world now so there is a chance it may have drawn attention, otherwise we may never have heard a word from the Pegula's until they came out the other end. 

That said there hasn't been anything indicating one way or the other. If the shoe was on the other foot and I were in a hospital bed, I would want my daughter at Wembley this week. But that is me, and I certainly don't think every family should prescribe to that line of thinking. Just pointing out that Jessica's attendance or lack there of probably isn't a great indicator.  Luckily it is not a decision I have ever had to deal with. 

 

Continued good vibes to the Pegula's through all of this. 

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14 hours ago, Beerball said:

Your doctor tells you to say cough?

Now picturing Hemet at the Dr.s office with his head turned to one side yelling "COUGH!" with increasing frustration at his incompetent doc.

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On 6/19/2022 at 5:09 PM, Herc11 said:

Not quite correct. ICU is not for "observation." There are specific criteria that a patient needs to meet to be transferred to a critical care unit. We don't take patients for "observation." 

 

Also, your staffing comment is incorrect. Hospital staffing is tied to EVERY department. The medical floors do not have staff specially assigned for whatever an ICU call is. I think what you are referring to is whats called an RRT (Rapid Response Team). Hospitals due staff a crisis RN 24/7 typically to respond to RRT's. RRT's typically consist of an ICU Dr that is taking the calls from that shift, an RT, and the crisis RN. Depending on the hospital size, depends on how many crisis RN's are on staff.


 

im talking in generalities. I’m not talking in very specific terms.  Some of the staff is required to be on because it has an ICU. If the ICU was closed they would not be on staff in the hospital.  These generally are for 2nd and overnight shift times.

 

I’ve dealt in hospital staffing/data for a good chunk of my career.

On 6/20/2022 at 10:46 AM, Mr. WEO said:

 

Most "medical consumers" know exactly what they are paying for (more accurately, what their insurer or the public is paying for).  It has been routine for decades in this country for patients to see providers other than an MD/DO.  NP's have long been licensed to practice unsupervised.  PAs less so.  MDs aren't being "replaced"--there simply aren't enough of them (and a lot of them aren't very good).  

 

Your "attending physician" doesn't need close to "a minimum of 21,000 hours of clinical training before practicing independently".   A Primary Care or Family Medicine or Pediatric MD trains for 3 years and at most 80 hours a week (they don't come close to this).  The most hours they could log would be 12,000.  And still in their frist year of practice may be less useful to the patient than their seasoned NP/PA.


 

most do not.

 

they really don’t know the difference between an MD and NP/PA.

 

whrn it comes to communication if they are talked to by a nurse or some other qualified med tech thry might listen to them better than be intimidated by an MD.

 

 

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On 6/20/2022 at 1:03 PM, Herc11 said:

 

Depends on the state if an NP can practice alone. PA's in every state must be supervised.

 

Experience wise there can be a difference with an NP and a PA. At least when they first start practicing.

 

To become an NP you have to first become an RN. Some states require an ASN (associates) and some BSN (bachelors). If you started with an ASN, you have to then complete your BSN. Then you can work on either an MSN or a Doctorate for you NP program. Currently, the minimum for NP is an MSN. However, that was supposed to change to a minimum of a doctorates, but thats been put on hold from what I understand. So your typical NP has many years of actual experience in the medical field, prior to taking the leap to become an NP. 

 

To become a PA, you only need a bachelors degree and it can be in anything. PA schools have pre-req classes, but your degree doesn't matter. There are some schools that offer a 4 year degree while simultaneously going to PA school, but not many as I found in my research. So essentially, you can have someone that got a bachelors in history, then decided to become a PA. My wife worked with a PA that did this. PA school itself is about 3 yrs. 


i look at MD as a phD level + training 
PA/NP are effectively masters level programs + training

 

is there a difference in care?

 

for 85%+ of the patients it’s not a difference when you have typical well known medical conditions.

 

the bigger problems comes when you have more complexities in the case or the case diesnt fit the text book.

 

i see specialists in two different locations. A couple of them are PAs because these are well controlled and maintain conditions but I want to still see them for awareness of the complexity of my conditions.

 

i regular go to university medical centers.  These are very different than typical medicine.  Depending on the area theyare Nita’s focus on things like rd run and per hour patient encounter counts.  In some areas the dr might have to have 4 patients an hour.

 

university MC are heavy on med students  and residency.  This is different than a resident clinic which also exist. I was in a resident clinic previously.  In some of the docs I see I do see a resident first.  I do spend time with the md.

 

Over my years I’m certain I’ve been written about in papers or talked about in talks given.

 

pre Covid a well respected nationally known doctor from buffalo died.  The national journal where he served as editor on had devoted part of an issue to him after his passing. I was easily in his top 3 complex/ experience/story about  patients he ever saw in his career.  
 

If I got frequent flier miles for medical documents at childrens I would have circled the globe a few times.

 

 

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7 hours ago, djp14150 said:


 

im talking in generalities. I’m not talking in very specific terms.  Some of the staff is required to be on because it has an ICU. If the ICU was closed they would not be on staff in the hospital.  These generally are for 2nd and overnight shift times.

 

I’ve dealt in hospital staffing/data for a good chunk of my career.


 

most do not.

 

they really don’t know the difference between an MD and NP/PA.

 

whrn it comes to communication if they are talked to by a nurse or some other qualified med tech thry might listen to them better than be intimidated by an MD.

 

 

Well of course they have to staff critical care nurses in the ICU. Unless you have critical care experience you don't have the qualifications to work in the ICU. And of course its staffed 24/7, patients in the ICU require 24/7 monitoring and don't go home at the end of the day. There are few units that are not 24/7 in a hospital, OR, Cath Lab, Endo, etc... if you were at a hospital that closes its ICU because the critical care census is zero, thats quite a small hospital.

 

I am a critical care RN btw, so it's not like I'm blowing smoke.

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3 hours ago, Herc11 said:

Well of course they have to staff critical care nurses in the ICU. Unless you have critical care experience you don't have the qualifications to work in the ICU. And of course its staffed 24/7, patients in the ICU require 24/7 monitoring and don't go home at the end of the day. There are few units that are not 24/7 in a hospital, OR, Cath Lab, Endo, etc... if you were at a hospital that closes its ICU because the critical care census is zero, thats quite a small hospital.

 

I am a critical care RN btw, so it's not like I'm blowing smoke.

 

Actually, blowing smoke was something that doctors did back in the 1700s, so don't sell yourself short!

 

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2014/05/origin-expression-blow-smoke-ass/#:~:text=When someone is “blowing smoke,blew smoke up people's rectums.

 

Back in the late 1700s, however, doctors literally blew smoke up people’s rectums. Believe it or not, it was a general mainstream medical procedure used to, among many other things, resuscitate people who were otherwise presumed dead. In fact, it was such a commonly used resuscitation method for drowning victims particularly, that the equipment used in this procedure was hung alongside certain major waterways, such as along the River Thames (equipment courtesy of the Royal Humane Society). People frequenting waterways were expected to know the location of this equipment similar to modern times concerning the location of defibrillators.

 

Smoke was blown up the rectum by inserting a tube. This tube was connected to a fumigator and a bellows which when compressed forced smoke into the rectum.

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7 hours ago, Gugny said:

 

Actually, blowing smoke was something that doctors did back in the 1700s, so don't sell yourself short!

 

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2014/05/origin-expression-blow-smoke-ass/#:~:text=When someone is “blowing smoke,blew smoke up people's rectums.

 

Back in the late 1700s, however, doctors literally blew smoke up people’s rectums. Believe it or not, it was a general mainstream medical procedure used to, among many other things, resuscitate people who were otherwise presumed dead. In fact, it was such a commonly used resuscitation method for drowning victims particularly, that the equipment used in this procedure was hung alongside certain major waterways, such as along the River Thames (equipment courtesy of the Royal Humane Society). People frequenting waterways were expected to know the location of this equipment similar to modern times concerning the location of defibrillators.

 

Smoke was blown up the rectum by inserting a tube. This tube was connected to a fumigator and a bellows which when compressed forced smoke into the rectum.

You never know what you might learn by browsing a football fansite! 🍺

Thanks for the fun history lesson.

I feel like smoke "treatments" are going to be the next big thing in alternative medicine.

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On 6/23/2022 at 12:38 AM, Gugny said:

Back in the late 1700s, however, doctors literally blew smoke up people’s rectums.

Politicians do that to the general public, every day of the week...

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2 hours ago, Buffalo Barbarian said:

 

Not me genuis the the helping, you were the best moderator after all.

I see, don't disrespect what you said. That makes it much better.

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4 hours ago, Buffalo Barbarian said:

 

Not me genuis the the helping, you were the best moderator after all.

 

1 hour ago, Beerball said:

I see, don't disrespect what you said. That makes it much better.

 

 

You guys need to get a room….. :D 

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Jessica is still showing as due to play in the first round at Wimbledon today, so let’s hope that’s a good indication that nothing has changed for the worse. If I’m going to speculate, I’d rather do it in a positive and hopeful manner. 

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If Jessica shows up and plays in Wimbledon in a few minutes, then this rumor must be wrong. Not gonna let her play then tell her "Oh by the way, Mom died today, and good luck in your match tomorrow!"

Edited by BuffaloBill
Will not include speculative rumors
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3 minutes ago, BuffaloBill said:

Please do not report unfounded rumors.

I never claimed it as fact. Actually went out of my way to share full context and say I have no way of verifying, but there's a lot of relevant info there. 

5 minutes ago, Bob Chandler's Hands said:

If Jessica shows up and plays in Wimbledon in a few minutes, then this rumor must be wrong. Not gonna let her play then tell her "Oh by the way, Mom died today, and good luck in your match tomorrow!"

I don't think it means anything if she plays IMO. I think Kim would want her to play, and she would try to push through, but obv hoping this isn't true

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6 minutes ago, BillsShredder83 said:

I don't think it means anything if she plays IMO. I think Kim would want her to play, and she would try to push through, but obv hoping this isn't true

There could be scenarios where this is the case. 

Just hoping it's an unfounded rumor... 

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