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VW82

We're building the offense around the passing attack

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13 hours ago, TJC34 said:

We did not give up a "Kings Ransom" to draft Allen. 

 

Yep. When no future picks of any kind, let alone high ones, are used to acquire your QB high up in the first round, it just doesn’t qualify as a king’s ransom. Beane parlayed 2018 picks acquired in trades into two first round picks. He invested in draft capital and spent that draft capital on targeted prospects. No ransom involved.

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35 minutes ago, matter2003 said:

Welcome to what the rest of the league has been doing for the last 20 years...better late than never I guess...

 

...with "F Troop" runnin' the show for SEVENTEEN years, what the hell would you expect O'Rourke??..................

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The running game is the heart of the Rams offense. Gurley's unavailability the last few games killed them. FWIW, I think McBeane are building a team more in the Rams mold.

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11 hours ago, VW82 said:

Mitch Morse and Cody Ford are both known as much better pass blockers than run blockers. If you disagree with that, you're going against the majority of scout takes and draft profiles out there for whatever that's worth. If someone wants to claim to be a Morse or Ford aficionado I'm prepared to listen and update my thinking. 

 

We paid a lot of money to Cole Beasley who is a slot receiver. Generally you're picking two of a TE, FB, or slot WR. That probably means a few less play calls involving a TE + FB. 

 

We brought in Frank Gore who is a noted pass blocker at the RB position. McCoy has always been a little small for that though he was an incredible runner for years. 

 

There are a lot of signs that we're going to lean much more on the passing attack this year. I'm surprised to be getting this much push back. 

I don't have any doubt they looked at pass protection first when signing players. Morse, Spain and Ford are all very good pass protectors.

 

Spain was actually a pretty good run blocker when he started and Russ Grimm was the Titans OL coach. But Grimm retired and they went to a zone blocking scheme. He's not very good at reaching for players and diving for ankles. But he CAN move people. Not surprisingly, I think the Titans OL fell off as a whole when a new OL coach came in and they decided to change the blocking scheme.  Another great NFL coaching move.

 

I've watched Morse nearly weekly for most of his career with the Chiefs. Yeah, he's a very good pass blocker, but he's not a bad run blocker. He holds his own in the middle of the field and he can pull or get out in space. Remember, people thought the Chief's run game would fall off when Kareem Hunt was kicked off the team. It really didn't. The reason was the scheme and the talent on the OL.  Morse was a big part of that.

 

Oklahoma did have a good deal of ZBS in their game plan. But if you've ever watched Cody Ford cave in the right side of their line, he can understand that he's capable of moving people.

 

There's nothing wrong with making pass pro a priority, but it doesn't mean the run game will suffer. It really should improve this year if these guys are used correctly.

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11 hours ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

 

I dunno what "run first" means exactly, but Seasnakes and Ravens tend to break about even on rush attempts vs pass attemps, or even rush a bit more than they pass.

Seasnakes have won and played in a SB and had consistent playoff appearances 6 of last 7 seasons (looks like success might be fading though?)

Ravens won a SB what, 7 years ago? and prior to that enjoyed good success with a rush-heavy offense.

 

A number of teams would never be described as "run first" but they noticeably improve their success when they balance their passing attack with a better rushing game.  Rams, N'Orleans, and Da Bears would all be  examples.

 

It's been said that a successful rushing attack is a young QB's best friend, and I do believe it.  So I hope our plan is balance.  Somewhere between 45% - 48% rush attempts/(rush+pass) would be about right.

 

 

I'll wait to discuss a change in philosophy to becoming a passing team, when it's seen to be changed.

One can find equal evidence that we're trying to upgrade our rush game as well.

 

This, and apologies for the long post.

 

We all hear it is a passing league, but a solid run game is still essential and NE put on a clinic last year that a strong run game coupled with short possession passing can still be pretty effective - added bonus of preserving Brady's 40+ year old noodle arm while keeping that other team's high-flying offense cooling their heels on the sideline too. Their defense, like ours was also good at limiting opponent TOP and creating turnovers.

 

They rushed for 1st downs an average of 131 to opponents 93, passing attempt for 1st down averages were too close to call which tells you that NE was able to possess the ball and run more rushing plays on average than their opponents. Now their average rushing plays (and this is where the contrast with the rest of the league can be seen) NE rushed 478 times while the average for the rest of the league was 367. Sony Michel was their workhorse for most of that. Passing they only attempted 574 to the league average of 605, BUT NE completed 378 to the league average of 370. So on average teams try 30 or so passes more than NE, but they have nearly 40 more fall incomplete. They were 10+ in turnover ratio. 

 

Not to be Captain Ahab tilting at whales with my NE comparisons, but it seemed fitting when folks get so enamored with high flying offenses that you look at the team that has been able to bring those teams down and learn something from that.

 

Running the ball is still effective strategy, but you have to keep the sticks moving and maintain possession of the ball (as one can see with the increased number of plays on average NE was able to run). They are efficient in the passing game having far fewer passes fall incomplete, but not in the traditional sense of having a clear #1 WR diva-type that some on this board seems so determined to find; rather the ball is spread around to guys who do not drop it with the average yards around 15 - Gordon was their guy for stretching the field but only by a bit... note White who had the most reception but averaged 8.6 yards - evidence of that short possession game that the coaches want Allen to master over time.

 

James White 87 751 8.6 42 7
Julian Edelman 74 850 11.5 36 6
Rob Gronkowski 47 682 14.5 42 3
Josh Gordon 40 720 18.0 55 3
Chris Hogan 35 532 15.2 63 3

 

All this being said I don't think there should be any specific offensive philosophy the Bills fall into, rather being proficient running and passing and tailoring game plans for the next opponent. The only guiding principal that I think they stay committed to is working strategies into the game plan to wean Allen away a bit from the "hero ball" he plays to leaning a bit more on his team mates. That means having some patience with the short high-percentage game and working the running game that did not exist last year. 

 

This does not mean that Allen will not take his deep shots, if he sees Brown or Foster singled up or uncovered he is going to use his cannon arm - as he should. His arm strength is an advantage that the Bills should not ignore. Also does not mean that Allen will not take off some times, he was pretty dangerous with his legs and gradually was learning to head for the sidelines or slide to avoid the big hits. If a defense gives up 15 yards of green in front of them, Allen is going to take off (and should) if he is confident he can get a 1st down or more.

 

More effective balance in our offense (rushes and short high-% passes) less turnovers or "3 and outs", just means it is going to be a nightmare for defensive coordinators to game plan the Bills. Of course we also need a defense that does not bend so much that teams can simply eat up the clock moving slowly down the field keeping our offense off the field (the flaw of that bend-don't-break nonsense) - statistically we have a very good defense, but teams with a good rushing attacks were able to move the sticks on us while we feasted on teams with poor offensive lines and passing attacks. I think those feasting games inflated our defensive averages and ranking enough to create some misleading assumptions. Lastly the wild card that cost us a few games where the offense and defense played tough, we need a Special Teams unit that can kick the ball, notch field goals when needed, cover to protect field position, or tilt field position a bit in our favor which was largely missing last year. 

 

A lot needs to come together this year and not just the offense, and maybe Vegas is right, but they lean on metrics so much and can be blind to teams that are on the crux of breaking out. The Bills could be that team this year and I can't wait to see what the coaching staff is able to do.

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Logic said:

"You need to be able to run it when they know you're going to run it and throw it when they know you're going to throw it"

- Sean McDermott

Just look at who our offensive coordinator is and where he came from. I believe the Bills want to get to the point where their offense can be that multiple from week to week, just like the Patriots. Some weeks they'll be a run-first attack. Some weeks they'll go 5-wide all game and spread the defense out. Depends on the opponent. This is the best way to have consistent offensive success in the NFL, as the Patriots have shown.

 

That quote comes across as basically out-execute your opponent, which is very Jauron-esque.  

 

I see far too much emphasis on the OC and his pedigree and not enough on the HC he works for.  Sean McDermott creates the the game plan and the OC and DC implement that.  It doesn't matter where Daboll or Frazier came from when it comes to what they want to do in a game.   

 

Nothing about McCoach screams to me that he's innovative or ready to throw the ball 35+ times each week.  Sure, the offense may throw deep now and then, but the HC is a play it safe guy who's looking at field position, ball control, and the like.  Former DCs turned HCs (cue the Belichick reference) typically tend to coach from their way of thinking and McD is no different.  Dude isn't changing his spots in year 3.  Maybe he does start the season throwing it all over the field, but the likelihood is he doesn't, and the offense remains predicated on the running game.  

 

The other factor is McD is in year 3 of his tenure.  Think he's going to become a pass happy guy with more talent? Doubt it.  He knows they need to show results and he'll go with what he knows - run the ball and get a strong defense.  

Edited by BillsVet

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So far, I see no proof that we’re moving to a passing attack, not that I wouldn’t be happier if our new O-line and WRs allow Allen options to spread the defense and stretch the field - that opens the field for the running game, which Beane has also vastly improved, IMHO.

 

If we’re planning a Spread/Air-Raid type offense, McDermott needs to do what Belichick does - sit down with Mike Leach.

 

But I don’t see that.  (Wish I did, since it seems to have caught on with most NFL teams, and certainly throughout the NCAA.)

 

I see a plan to protect Josh, give him more time in the pocket,  WRs/TEs who can both stretch the field and catch a football, and - at the same time - improve our running game.

.

 

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16 hours ago, LSHMEAB said:

How many run first teams are successful in the NFL? This is a passing league.

 

Castillo's scheme was a disaster as was the overall talent. They didn't acquire true road graders, but combined with a shift from zone to man, I expect the run game to be quite a bit better. 

 

The key to the offense will be Allen's improvement or lack thereof. If he progresses, it will take care of itself.

 

Everyone calls it a passing league but the Pats smoked the Chargers and Chiefs in the playoffs by running the ball against their pass-stacked dbacks.  In the KC game alone they had 50 run plays.   Sprinkled in some play action throws here and there, but controlled both playoff teams (and whipped us badly for 300 yards on the ground in NE) by handing off and pounding.

 

When I see guys like Dawkins and Ford on the Oline it's hard not to think we could get back to the same ground attack we had with Shady and Touchdown Mike.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, CookieG said:

I don't have any doubt they looked at pass protection first when signing players. Morse, Spain and Ford are all very good pass protectors.

 

Spain was actually a pretty good run blocker when he started and Russ Grimm was the Titans OL coach. But Grimm retired and they went to a zone blocking scheme. He's not very good at reaching for players and diving for ankles. But he CAN move people. Not surprisingly, I think the Titans OL fell off as a whole when a new OL coach came in and they decided to change the blocking scheme.  Another great NFL coaching move.

 

I've watched Morse nearly weekly for most of his career with the Chiefs. Yeah, he's a very good pass blocker, but he's not a bad run blocker. He holds his own in the middle of the field and he can pull or get out in space. Remember, people thought the Chief's run game would fall off when Kareem Hunt was kicked off the team. It really didn't. The reason was the scheme and the talent on the OL.  Morse was a big part of that.

 

Oklahoma did have a good deal of ZBS in their game plan. But if you've ever watched Cody Ford cave in the right side of their line, he can understand that he's capable of moving people.

 

There's nothing wrong with making pass pro a priority, but it doesn't mean the run game will suffer. It really should improve this year if these guys are used correctly.

 

Good post. I agree the run game should be better as it was awful last year. Perhaps I'm selling our Oline short and they'll all be maulers, and we'll have a top ranked run game. Guess we'll see. I'm very optimistic they'll be able to pass protect though.

 

Again, it was some of the other clues - Beasley and Gore signings, overhauling the WR group, coupled with what looked like an emphasis on better pass blockers - that made it look like we're planning on throwing it more this year, or at least play calling based on the threat of the pass. As others have said, a balanced attack is best.   

Edited by VW82

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Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, The Senator said:

 

So far, I see no proof that we’re moving to a passing attack...

 

 

Besides the vast improvement in pass blocking talent across the line and at running back, paying a slot receiver in Beasley a lot of money is definitely one clue. Often you're stuck choosing between a slot guy and a fullback. It's obviously not as simple as saying one is for passing and one is for rushing, but I do think that choice says something about the identity of your team. We've been a full back team for a while now and it looks like we intend to be a three WR team more this year.  

Edited by VW82

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47 minutes ago, BillsVet said:

 

That quote comes across as basically out-execute your opponent, which is very Jauron-esque.  

 

I see far too much emphasis on the OC and his pedigree and not enough on the HC he works for.  Sean McDermott creates the the game plan and the OC and DC implement that.  It doesn't matter where Daboll or Frazier came from when it comes to what they want to do in a game.   

 

Nothing about McCoach screams to me that he's innovative or ready to throw the ball 35+ times each week.  Sure, the offense may throw deep now and then, but the HC is a play it safe guy who's looking at field position, ball control, and the like.  Former DCs turned HCs (cue the Belichick reference) typically tend to coach from their way of thinking and McD is no different.  Dude isn't changing his spots in year 3.  Maybe he does start the season throwing it all over the field, but the likelihood is he doesn't, and the offense remains predicated on the running game.  

 

The other factor is McD is in year 3 of his tenure.  Think he's going to become a pass happy guy with more talent? Doubt it.  He knows they need to show results and he'll go with what he knows - run the ball and get a strong defense.  

I just find it hard to take a guys opinion on offense seriously who kept trotting out Nate ***** Peterman.

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53 minutes ago, BillsVet said:

 

That quote comes across as basically out-execute your opponent, which is very Jauron-esque.  

 

I see far too much emphasis on the OC and his pedigree and not enough on the HC he works for.  Sean McDermott creates the the game plan and the OC and DC implement that.  It doesn't matter where Daboll or Frazier came from when it comes to what they want to do in a game.   

 

Nothing about McCoach screams to me that he's innovative or ready to throw the ball 35+ times each week.  Sure, the offense may throw deep now and then, but the HC is a play it safe guy who's looking at field position, ball control, and the like.  Former DCs turned HCs (cue the Belichick reference) typically tend to coach from their way of thinking and McD is no different.  Dude isn't changing his spots in year 3.  Maybe he does start the season throwing it all over the field, but the likelihood is he doesn't, and the offense remains predicated on the running game.  

 

The other factor is McD is in year 3 of his tenure.  Think he's going to become a pass happy guy with more talent? Doubt it.  He knows they need to show results and he'll go with what he knows - run the ball and get a strong defense.  

Per the bold text, what do you imagine McD’s role is in creating the offensive game plan? How do you envision his discussions with Daboll unfold on a week to week basis? 

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17 hours ago, VW82 said:

FWIW I think this is probably smart. We gave up a king's ransom to draft Allen, and even though there have been some giant red flags to date he clearly has talent.

 

There has been lots of talk about the new receiver group and how that will help, but the new Oline is really well built to pass protect (and not as much to run block). Morse and Ford, in particular, are well above average pass protectors, though perhaps not as great in the running game. Singletary adds a jolt of excitement to our RB group but the main guys are well past their prime and the overall talent level at this stage isn't something we can probably lean on.

 

There's going to be a lot of pressure on the passing game to take a big step forward this year. McBeane appear to have designed it that way. Buffalo usually builds with their run game in mind as you need to be able to get tough yards in Dec/Jan when the weather turns.

 

Was it smart to build our offense this way or should we have gone after road graders and a world class RB to pair with Allen, and take pressure off him using play action? Overall I like what we've done and I think the change in team building strategy is interesting.  

 

Edited the title so it doesn't sound so negative.

This is a myth and people should stop repeating this sort of thing.

 

 

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7 hours ago, joevan said:

We pick up a Hall of Fame running back, we have a borderline Hall of Fame running back, draft a running back early, and we don''t draft a wide receiver and we're trending towards a passing attack. Huh.

 

Smokescreen. 😉

 

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2 minutes ago, ScottLaw said:

I just find it hard to take a guys opinion on offense seriously who kept trotting out Nate ***** Peterman.

 

Love to argue with you there, but I cannot.

 

We can only hope that they simply thought there were flaws in Peterman's game in 2017 that could be corrected in the offseason and perhaps they tasked Daboll and Culley with doing just that while obviously not understanding that Peterman had traits (throwing it to the wrong jersey when under duress) that seem somewhat ingrained.

 

Nor will I ignore the poor judgment of surrounding Peterman with the kind of supporting cast they did other than they must have assumed that it was a throw away season with all the cap they shed. Beane could not come right out and say that they were not going to be as competitive as they needed to be and probably banked that our defense could at least keep games from being completely lopsided laughers while they gradually worked Allen into getting reps.

 

Also, from all reports Peterman was one of those guys who can light it up in practice only to stink it up live. The Peterman experiment in 2018 was mercifully short-lived, as Daboll must have convinced them that there was little there to salvage and it was time to wish him luck elsewhere.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, WideNine said:

 

Love to argue with you there, but I cannot.

 

We can only hope that they simply thought there were flaws in Peterman's game in 2017 that could be corrected in the offseason and perhaps they tasked Daboll and Culley with doing just that while obviously not understanding that Peterman had traits (throwing it to the wrong jersey when under duress) that seem somewhat ingrained.

 

Nor will I ignore the poor judgment of surrounding Peterman with the kind of supporting cast they did other than they must have assumed that it was a throw away season with all the cap they shed. Beane could not come right out and say that they were not going to be as competitive as they needed to be and probably banked that our defense could at least keep games from being completely lopsided laughers while they gradually worked Allen into getting reps.

 

Also, from all reports Peterman was one of those guys who can light it up in practice only to stink it up live. The Peterman experiment in 2018 was mercifully short-lived, as Daboll must have convinced them that there was little there to salvage and it was time to wish him luck elsewhere.

 

 

Well it's not just Peterman. 

 

Basically all their offensive moves have been flops which is quite alarming. 

 

KB, basically every offensive FA they signed last year, their offensive coaching hires, Zay Jones while not a bust a disappointment to this point.... thankfully Allen has looked like the best offensive decision they've made and it's their biggest decision. 

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1 hour ago, BillsVet said:

 

That quote comes across as basically out-execute your opponent, which is very Jauron-esque.  

 

I see far too much emphasis on the OC and his pedigree and not enough on the HC he works for.  Sean McDermott creates the the game plan and the OC and DC implement that.  It doesn't matter where Daboll or Frazier came from when it comes to what they want to do in a game.   

 

Nothing about McCoach screams to me that he's innovative or ready to throw the ball 35+ times each week.  Sure, the offense may throw deep now and then, but the HC is a play it safe guy who's looking at field position, ball control, and the like.  Former DCs turned HCs (cue the Belichick reference) typically tend to coach from their way of thinking and McD is no different.  Dude isn't changing his spots in year 3.  Maybe he does start the season throwing it all over the field, but the likelihood is he doesn't, and the offense remains predicated on the running game.  

 

The other factor is McD is in year 3 of his tenure.  Think he's going to become a pass happy guy with more talent? Doubt it.  He knows they need to show results and he'll go with what he knows - run the ball and get a strong defense.  


I just disagree with pretty much everything you said, especially the bolded.

McDermott has literally said that he realizes it's a passing league, and that you need to be able to pass the ball well to win consistently. He's also stated that he realizes that you need to be able to consistently score a lot of points to win. 

In my opinion, the only reason his Bills teams have had to "play it safe" and concentrate on field position and ball control is that they were vastly outmanned in terms of offensive personnel, and he knew it. When you have bad offensive personnel and great defensive personnel, the only logical thing to do is to play ball control offense, shorten the game, and hope to eke out close victories. McDermott stated specifically that he does NOT want to win games 10-7 every week. He acknowledged that that's not a sustainable way to win consistently. He knows this.

Once Josh Allen returned from injury last year and showed that he could handle an increased volume of playcalls, the playbook and the passing game began to open up. By the end of the year, Daboll was calling multiple personnel groupings and passing concepts that were taken straight from the best passing offenses in the league, like the Chiefs, Rams, and Patriots. Motions, jet sweeps, orbit actions, mesh concepts, dagger concepts, you name it. He was also employing full-on 5 WR sets and Air Raid and spread passing concepts.

Personally, I'll wait to see what the Bills offense does this year now that they have vastly improved talent at the WR and OL positions and a quarterback they believe in and who has a whole offseason and preseason of starting reps. I'm not ready to say what McDermott does or does not believe in (even though, as I said, he specifically SAID he knows you have to pass the ball well and that he DOESN'T want to win close games), because I know his gameplans have been limited by inferior personnel. 

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1 hour ago, Da webster guy said:

 

Everyone calls it a passing league but the Pats smoked the Chargers and Chiefs in the playoffs by running the ball against their pass-stacked dbacks.  In the KC game alone they had 50 run plays.   Sprinkled in some play action throws here and there, but controlled both playoff teams (and whipped us badly for 300 yards on the ground in NE) by handing off and pounding.

 

When I see guys like Dawkins and Ford on the Oline it's hard not to think we could get back to the same ground attack we had with Shady and Touchdown Mike.

 

 

Yeah. As Hapless pointed out, the really good teams GENERALLY have a balanced attack. My point was mainly direct at the OP. I feel like we've done enough to try to improve the run game. The offensive line will be BETTER and the scheme is infinitely better even if a few of the key guys graded out better in pass pro. We signed Gore and drafted a RB in the 3rd round. It's not like we neglected the run game. Fired OL coach, signed a bunch of FA OL, signed Gore/Yeldon and drafted Singletary. Not quite sure how that's putting all our eggs in one basket.

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, TJC34 said:

We did not give up a "Kings Ransom" to draft Allen. 

A Josh Allen being picked again at #7 by the Jags this year just shows me how much sense the Bills pick was. This impostor Josh Allen 😆 is a linebacker. Unless he becomes legendary like a LT, the impact a very good/great/elite QB can have on the whole team is so much greater!

 

I too thought at first the line was built for a pass heavy attack but later signings make it more versatile. As for using playoff teams as proof the running game matters, of course it does, a lot. But if you make the playoffs you had many wins where you ran out the clock. Other data has to be used. Some OLine are obviously better at pushing back the pile than others, and it doesn't always show as the overall best run yards.

 

 

Edited by Jerome007

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The offensive linemen and tight ends we signed and drafted are built for the run-game.

We drafted a TE who never caught a TD pass, the other one is known for his blocking...and Kroft is a run-blocking TE, who had 36 yards receiving last year.

Plus we signed a former OT who is transitioning to TE.

We didn't draft a WR, but we drafted a RB and signed two more.

This team is building to run the ball A LOT...not for the pass-game.

Any passing attack we have will be bombs or 5-yard dink-and-dunks.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, ScottLaw said:

Well it's not just Peterman. 

 

Basically all their offensive moves have been flops which is quite alarming. 

 

KB, basically every offensive FA they signed last year, their offensive coaching hires, Zay Jones while not a bust a disappointment to this point.... thankfully Allen has looked like the best offensive decision they've made and it's their biggest decision. 


I wouldn't say "all", but then again, you're ScottLaw, so I'm not surprised that you would. If you're going to ding them for their failures (KB, Peterman, Vlad Ducasse, Anquan Boldin), its only fair to also give them props for their successes. That's called objectivity. And you know what ? Their offenses have been generally poor overall in season 1 and season 2. Let's just put that right out front. It still seems only fair/reasonable, though, to weigh the hits with the misses.

Dion Dawkins is a pretty good tackle. Not elite, but pretty darn good. And after they saw that Andre Holmes and KB weren't working out at WR, and that Allen functioned better with WRs who got better separation, they quickly course corrected and brought up Robert Foster and brought in Ian McKenzie. Now they've also brought in John Brown and Cole Beasley, and while the jury is still out on those two, the odds of them being "flops" seems low, since they're already proven as worthy contributors in this league. Mitch Morse looks unlikely to be a flop, too. And as you stated, Josh Allen seems so far to have been a good decision.

While this staff has made mistakes, they have also been quick to own those mistakes and fix them. Rick Dennison? Not so good, gone after one year. KB and Holmes? Not getting it done, gone and replaced with younger, speedier options. The o-line? Wasn't cutting it, so they signed 6,000 o-linemen (including the best center on the market) and drafted a 1st round caliber offensive tackle.

Robert Foster's a big one that they should get credit for, too, by the way. They basically got #1 or, at worst, #2 WR production out of a rookie UDFA receiver. They found him, acquired him, coached him up on the practice squad, and brought him up to the main roster. He was a game changer down the stretch. That's big. The ability to find that type of game breaking talent in undrafted free agency should count for something.

If you're going to bring up the bad, you should bring up the good, too. Otherwise you're just being a real ScottLaw.

Edited by Logic
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6 hours ago, yungmack said:

The running game is the heart of the Rams offense. Gurley's unavailability the last few games killed them. FWIW, I think McBeane are building a team more in the Rams mold.

 

 

his what?

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I think building the offense around the passing attack is a huge mistake. Allen's wheels are much, much better than his arm and always will be. I say run first and pass later to take advantage of his strength rather than trying to imagine that he throws accurately, which he's never done in college or the NFL.

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21 hours ago, TigerJ said:

I agree with TroutDog.  I know that some of the scouting reports on the new linemen suggest strength at pass blocking, I think there is reason to believe they will be better at run blocking than the line was last season.  I' know I'm a homer, but I think they will be a lot better at run blocking this season.  Of course, the bar was set pretty low last season.

 

The lack of an established threat at WR alone mitigates against any argument that the line's strength is pass blocking.  Tough to look good protecting the QB if the WRs can't reliably beat single coverage. 

 

That could change, obviously, with preseason and the start of the season.  But to argue it now is kind-of silly.

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21 hours ago, VW82 said:

Ok, ok...but seriously, nobody wants to talk about the apparent change in philosophy to becoming a passing team? The evidence is all over the roster. We were still a run first team last year even though we didn't really have the personnel. I'll be shocked if we're a run first team this year. 

I think that you will be shocked.  Every OL brought in is very big and powerful.  I worry a bit that they won’t be able to pass block well, but I think the emphasis will be run first.  They kept McCoy, signed Gore and Yeldon and drafted Singletary early.  That says run first to me.

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