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GregPersons

Goodell opens door for Kaepernick return. How will this end? Take your bets!

How will this resolve?  

110 members have voted

  1. 1. What will happen with Kaepernick and the NFL?

    • A team will sign him (name the team)
    • He'll join the NFL front office
    • Kaepernick will remain out of the NFL entirely


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26 minutes ago, C.Biscuit97 said:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.si.com/.amp/sportsperson/2017/12/06/colin-kaepernick-charity-giving-donations
 

and like most people, he’s far from a perfect messenger.  I Didn’t agree with the pig socks either.  I don’t really think he wanted all this.  I think he’s always been a quiet guy and wanted to give attention to this issue.  I just never got why it bother people so much.  Go to any nfl stadium and you will see thousands of people doing other stuff during the attention.  You will see people with confederate flags at some stadiums.  
 

and I respect your opinion.  It just bothers me that some people cared more about CK than domestic violence players.  I missed those protests or threatening not to watch.  I said if the Bills signed Vick, I would be done with the Bills.  To me, that makes more sense than quitting because of a silent protest for police brutality but to each it’s own.  And any fan quits over this really won’t be missed.  Like it not, these players have a big platform and they are using that.  

The thing is, and you may find this difficult to believe, the kneeling is not what bothered me. Kaepernick has a right to do that protest.

 

Would I kneel during the playing of the National Anthem, no, but that's just me.

 

What bothered me were the things that came later. The pig socks, the Castro shirt, not voting in the election, the idea that the Star Spangled Banner is a racist song. Kaepernick was terrible at PR.

All of those things looked very bad on his part and they became distractions.

Did Kaepernick really think that all of that was going to bring all people to his cause?

 

I'm in complete agreement with you on the domestic violence issue. Kaepernick is nowhere near the level of those individuals.

 

Again, my biggest issue about Kaepernick, is that I don't see any action from him, only words. In this situation, you have to do more than just talk.

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5 minutes ago, GregPersons said:

 

That's true, especially with how oblivious coaches can be at evaluating talent. The reality is that coaches are often just working with someone they can vibe with, someone they can communicate with.

 

Anthony Lynn with the Chargers ... he and Kaep would gel, I feel confident. 

 

Put it in front of as many people as you can. It's... ah I dont even know where to begin.

 

I'll just say that. It's funny - and again it's by design - how Americans are all so certain we are much too clever to ever be persuaded by government propaganda. Us? Come on...!

 

Sure, okay, I'll give you that even. It goes both ways, though. Because really, more than virtue signaling, you see major cultural defensiveness.

 

It's like... imagine you are a boss doing a performance review for an employee. You're trying to tell the employee the ways they could be better; all they're doing is "WELL WHAT ABOUT...." 

 

You're like. Do I have to fire you? I just need you to listen, and stop doing the bad dumb evil things, because replacing you would be very difficult. So please just stop killing the other employees. And they're like "WELL THEY'RE JUST PART TIMERS!"

And thats like the employee telling me how unfair his supervisor has been while wearing a shirt that says "***** all management" with Hitler on.

 

Sure, its entirely possible there is a real gripe with the employees supervisor, but how do I take that individuals stance at face value if thats the message they perpetuate?

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4 minutes ago, GregPersons said:

Put it in front of as many people as you can. It's... ah I dont even know where to begin.

 

I'll just say that. It's funny - and again it's by design - how Americans are all so certain we are much too clever to ever be persuaded by government propaganda. Us? Come on...!

Agreed dude. I try to share that link with anyone I can. It’s wild stuff. I think regardless of which side of the fence you’re on with this issue, no one considers themselves a sucker. But that’s exactly what we’ve all been. Duped. It’s no wonder this issue touches a nerve with so many. Years and years (and years) of conditioning. That’s why it’s SO important we continue to educate ourselves on things like this. 

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19 minutes ago, ProcessYaDigg said:

In the end, bringing Kaep back into a football uniform doesn't make sense and it won't benefit anyone or solve any problems.  What the NFL should do is bring him in as a sounding board member or hold some position within the league that combats racism within the league.  The overall issue here shouldn't be whether or not Kaep should play in the NFL again.  The overall issue we should be discussing is how Kaep can contribute to eliminating racism as much as possible.  Kaep brought attention to the situation to all of America with a single kneel.  but change doesn't work that way.  You have to take baby steps.  Bring awareness to the locker room and change one locker room at a time within the NFL.  After the NFL is understanding of this awareness and understand that changes need to be made by each individual, then the league can then branch out to their own respective community.  Than those communities reach out to other communities within the states.  Change starts with each individual and within their own house.  Real change isn't going to happen to all of America overnight.  it's just impossible.  Goodell needs to get his house (the NFL) in order first and I think that would be a beneficial way in utilizing Kaep.  Don't open the door for him just to play.  Open the door for him to make changes throughout the NFL and possibly the rest of America.  The NFL has an opportunity on their hands if they choose to handle this the right way.

 

Good post.

Your heart is in the right place.

I'm going to help guide it a little closer to the bullseye. 

 

Kaepernick is one of many symbols of race in American history. In effect, he always was, the moment he became a starting QB in the NFL — but when he kneeled, he took individual control of his individual body and individual voice and actions, cognizant of his default status as a symbol of race in America. He decided — like the famous black gloved fist pump at the Olympics in the 70s — to take the spotlight and make it meaningful. The anthem already has meaning, yes. Kaepernick's kneel adds additional meaning; it creates a dialogue. The kneel says, America is a country of people. It's built on agreements, on a series of agreements that set precedents for future agreements. But it's become unclear if we have the same basic agreements. It's like a marriage in which after so much fighting about the bills and schedules, it's now unclear whether one party actually respects the other as another as a true equal, or if one partner is supposed to remain as a servant to the other.

 

It's helpful to understand racist and racism in the systemic and societal and larger sense of it (you're using it correctly it seems like, again just preaching to any readers). What is racist is what upholds racism. What is anti-racist is what challenges the things that uphold racism.

 

So, Kaepernick becoming a Super Bowl QB and kneeling = both anti-racist actions

Kaepernick being blacklisted for speaking out = racist; upholds different standards for which causes matter and which ones don't

The NFL apologizing to Kaepernick and acknowledging wrongdoing = anti-racist; yes its johnny come lately but it remains an action that challenges the status quo of racism

Kaepernick getting an offer from an NFL team = anti-racist in the same way

 

Whether Kaepernick chooses to take the offer or not, well, that could be debatable on whether that is or isn not a racist action. Anybody, any action, can be racist. If Kaepernick started, suddenly going on about how, like, George Floyd actually deserved to die becasue he was a drug addict... that would be racist. Even though he also has done many anti-racist actions. 

 

In other words...

 

It's a process! 

 

Trust the process. Stand against racism, big and small. Doesn't take much. Just a little bit of the (very fun once it's a muscle memory) F YOU when you see it. Might not change all hearts and minds, but imo, I am now going forward in life with a personal Zero Tolerance policy toward racism. It's just, the buck stops here. I am taking my part of responsibility and hoping that other people get mad enough to do the same.

 

And then, eventually — not today or tomorrow — but, eventually... eventually, maybe. You can't let the odds get you down. Nobody knows that more than Bills fans, other than black people. You gotta manufacture your own hope. 

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1 hour ago, GregPersons said:

 

How shocking would it be, really, if he played better than before? Everyone - not you specifically, just, the larger narrative around this - we all seem to be so certain Kaep would be worse, or at best, as good as he was before. I just love when people are so certain about the future, in general. (Not for nothing but I called Trump, as well; didn't want it, wasn't hoping for it, saw it coming a year in advance. Can't prove it, believe it or don't, w/e). Just saying! There is no definite anything

 

How cynical do we have to be about the human body and the physique and etc needed to play QB, especially now, where people are in better overall shape than ever and active at older ages?  Brady is in his 40s.  I get that they play a different kind of ball, but that's what I'm saying — Kaep having time off to heal his body, it's not wholly dissimilar to Gronkowski taking a year off or whatever, and who knows how that will go. 

10 yeas ago we all would have said no way.  this has become the way more intriguing story line when it comes to keap for me.  if he comes out on fire, could it help other players who may have been out of the league for a year or two.  i'd even go as far to say that he may have a better chance at coming back than gronk.  i just can't imagine gronk returning anywhere near to his old form...but again, who knows?

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43 minutes ago, C.Biscuit97 said:

Ron Jaworski, not exactly the best but whatever, once said CK had a chance to be the best quarterback ever.  That’s how he was thought of at one point.  And now he can’t play in the year because he’s not good enough?  Lies.

 

What would it have taken?  He had a great HC, WR's Boldin and Crabtree, Vernon Davis at TE and Gore in his prime.   What chance did he not get? The year after 2-14, Shanahan walked in and got 6 wins and an Offense that jumped from 31st to 12 out of the poo poo platter combo of Garappolo, Hoyer and C.J. Beathard.

 

 

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45 minutes ago, GregPersons said:

 

People's reactions to the pig socks, I think, are the worse offense. My sister-in-law is the same way as you, it's her biggest offense to the whole thing. Her brother's a cop; her parents are out and out racists. My brother, less so, but far more willing to tolerate it, obviously. 

 

My reaction to pig socks, personally is as follows: Pig socks? Who gives a crap? Are you kidding me? People are getting murdered in the streets, for no reason, and there is no repercussions for this. It is not considered a crime. And you're quibbling over the man's footwear? White culture is so full of lies and deception, it's nightmarish, and any white people who recognize it and can speak against it, ought to, because it's disgraceful. Instead of judging another man's socks, try imaginging yourself in them, imagining yourself in the position where you felt like that expressed your feeling. Pretend you have to live someone else's life. Empathy!

 

To your question. Have you not looked into this at all? He has been active. Also. Why is this his responsibility alone? Why wouldn't it be okay if just raising the issue was his role and that was it? Why does he have to identify it, notify you, sacrifice his career, and then also, btw, solve a 400+ year problem that's been ignored forever, and do it before kickoff.

 

Why are White people culturally so resistant to responsibility? They/we preach it ALL THE TIME... and yet on race... something White Culture invented and implemented... no responsibility, whatsoever. Always deferral. Always. It is so ghoulish and cowardly, I can't tell you how much it sickens me, tbh. Because it's optional. It's not necessary. White people, as a cultural force, could stop obstructing and work to be helpful to their fellow countrymen. It's really shameful, IMO, that the White race has no history of helping anyone but themselves. Imagine living in a time where maybe that would be different. It's very hard to do - da do-  da - do....

 

You are saying Dak donating money to the police is helpful, but just dismissing all of the money and causes and everything Kaepernick is doing... just the willingness to be so dismissive, that alone...... you're not getting it, man. You're choosing to not get it.

 

So, I'm not gonna make you get it. 

 

I just want you to know, it's really easy to watch you and see you choose to not get it. You're lying to me, or you're lying to yourself, but you are making the choice. You know what you are doing.

 

 I've always been told that you can catch more flies with honey than vinegar I think a lot of the back lash Kap may have experienced could have been due to his way of presenting it ? 

 

I don't know of a better way but i do know that Anquan Boldin after leaving the Bills started a group of athletes to go around to different cities & voicing his opinions to those that could hopefully make a difference .

 

I thought given the chance that Kap would have joined but didn't (as far as i know)  i think his energy's would have been better served if presented differently in a direction such as the way Boldin did rather than presenting most every thing he did in such a negative fashion along with the comments about being black balled from the NFL  .

 

I do know that prejudice has no color it can come from any one it doesn't matter your ethnicity & if there is to be a end to this it will need to take all of us collectively from all ethnic back grounds to invoke change not just a few ! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, TheProcess said:

Agreed dude. I try to share that link with anyone I can. It’s wild stuff. I think regardless of which side of the fence you’re on with this issue, no one considers themselves a sucker. But that’s exactly what we’ve all been. Duped. It’s no wonder this issue touches a nerve with so many. Years and years (and years) of conditioning. That’s why it’s SO important we continue to educate ourselves on things like this. 

 

Exactly. 

 

If you keep peeling back that onion, it's impossible to not feel betrayed, imo. Doesn't matter who you are. If you have any sense of American pride, and basic morality, I don't see how you can't arrive at the conclusion of like... this is a con game, holy crap, this is really just a pyramid scheme on a larger scale. Lol. Like... how did we fall for this. This is some Pick Up Artist nonsense.

 

"Rugged indivdualism." We have all been told... its funny that older generations apply this only to Millennials, like, there is literally a "Greatest Generation" lmao.... but we've all just accepted, as manifest destinty, that we are all SPECIAL. 

 

And because we are so SPECIAL, it is inconceivable that we wouldn't also already know everything. Particularly from Reagan forward, the new world order and status quo is "history is over. we won. we're all the winners! yay!"  Anything we want to hear, they're happy to deliver it, as long as it keeps your eye off the ball. 

 

Ohhhhh I could go on. It's not accidental. It's not a woopsie doo. It's, I think, truths we can hardly comprehend, its evil on a scale we aren't ready for. 

1 minute ago, T master said:

 

 I've always been told that you can catch more flies with honey than vinegar I think a lot of the back lash Kap may have experienced could have been due to his way of presenting it ? 

 

I don't know of a better way but i do know that Anquan Boldin after leaving the Bills started a group of athletes to go around to different cities & voicing his opinions to those that could hopefully make a difference .

 

I thought given the chance that Kap would have joined but didn't (as far as i know)  i think his energy's would have been better served if presented differently in a direction such as the way Boldin did rather than presenting most every thing he did in such a negative fashion along with the comments about being black balled from the NFL  .

 

I do know that prejudice has no color it can come from any one it doesn't matter your ethnicity & if there is to be a end to this it will need to take all of us collectively from all ethnic back grounds to invoke change not just a few ! 

 

 

The truth is that there is no right way to protest other than the effective way.  What's the nice way, anyway? If you think about it, it just means "the way that I don't have to see." But you seeing it is the point. The folks that aren't paying attention, and don't want to, how do you get them? That's the riddle.

 

In the 60s, sit-ins at diners were just cause to beat the ***** out of people and spray them with hoses and all sorts of horror. It was unimaginable that black and white people could eat at the same restaurant. The Beatles, Rolling Stones, most of the music you hear at the grocery store... recorded during a time where it was a debate whether or not Thurman Thomas could sit at the table next to you. It's not ancient history, it's really recent. 

17 minutes ago, BillsFan17 said:

And thats like the employee telling me how unfair his supervisor has been while wearing a shirt that says "***** all management" with Hitler on.

 

Sure, its entirely possible there is a real gripe with the employees supervisor, but how do I take that individuals stance at face value if thats the message they perpetuate?

 

Well, I'm not sure.  In my analogy, the boss/you was Kaepernick, offering a criticism, and the employee was White America who can't take any criticism or self-reflection whatsoever and have to turn it into something else where they can feel right. 

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35 minutes ago, ProcessYaDigg said:

In the end, bringing Kaep back into a football uniform doesn't make sense and it won't benefit anyone or solve any problems.  What the NFL should do is bring him in as a sounding board member or hold some position within the league that combats racism within the league.  The overall issue here shouldn't be whether or not Kaep should play in the NFL again.  The overall issue we should be discussing is how Kaep can contribute to eliminating racism as much as possible.  Kaep brought attention to the situation to all of America with a single kneel.  but change doesn't work that way.  You have to take baby steps.  Bring awareness to the locker room and change one locker room at a time within the NFL.  After the NFL is understanding of this awareness and understand that changes need to be made by each individual, then the league can then branch out to their own respective community.  Than those communities reach out to other communities within the states.  Change starts with each individual and within their own house.  Real change isn't going to happen to all of America overnight.  it's just impossible.  Goodell needs to get his house (the NFL) in order first and I think that would be a beneficial way in utilizing Kaep.  Don't open the door for him just to play.  Open the door for him to make changes throughout the NFL and possibly the rest of America.  The NFL has an opportunity on their hands if they choose to handle this the right way.

 

 

If the NFL (which is the owners, not their spokesperson) brought Kaepernick in a some sort of League Racial Issue Problem Solver or whatever, he's going to speak his mind.  He might say "here's a list of the first 10 changes we (the NFL) need to change immediately".  The majority of owners are not going to agree to what's on the list, most likely.  Then he speaks out about how the NFL is using him as window dressing, doesn't want real change.  A group of owners that didn't even want him sitting on their roster is going to put him in a very public position of telling them how to run their business?  No chance.

 

A cynic would say the best way for the NFL(for it's own interests) to go forward is have some team sign him and let him peacefully protest as he collects a paycheck--bury him on some roster.  Maybe gets some playing action and even wins a starting job somehow.  Then he's just another player who protests--but not above all others.

 

That's the NFL's plan.  Which team signs him is being discussed among them as we speak, no doubt.

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3 hours ago, C.Biscuit97 said:

So if he isn’t good (and I’m not really even arguing how good he is but rather he is a nfl qb), what do you call a guy with worse passing numbers with better weapons than him?
 

 

Josh Allen?

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2 minutes ago, Mr. WEO said:

 

 

If the NFL (which is the owners, not their spokesperson) brought Kaepernick in a some sort of League Racial Issue Problem Solver or whatever, he's going to speak his mind.  He might say "here's a list of the first 10 changes we (the NFL) need to change immediately".  The majority of owners are not going to agree to what's on the list, most likely.  Then he speaks out about how the NFL is using him as window dressing, doesn't want real change.  A group of owners that didn't even want him sitting on their roster is going to put him in a very public position of telling them how to run their business?  No chance.

 

A cynic would say the best way for the NFL(for it's own interests) to go forward is have some team sign him and let him peacefully protest as he collects a paycheck--bury him on some roster.  Maybe gets some playing action and even wins a starting job somehow.  Then he's just another player who protests--but not above all others.

 

That's the NFL's plan.  Which team signs him is being discussed among them as we speak, no doubt.

 

Let's remember, too, it wasn't actually Kaep who put himself above others. That was thrust upon him by the media reaction and by virtue of he was the biggest name doing it. He was the SB QB, a face talent, not a skill position.

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1 minute ago, GregPersons said:

 

Let's remember, too, it wasn't actually Kaep who put himself above others. That was thrust upon him by the media reaction and by virtue of he was the biggest name doing it. He was the SB QB, a face talent, not a skill position.

 

Now he would be another guy kneeling on the sideline.  After kickoff, he would be judged as a football player, no one would care about the rest.  Some cynics might also note that he twice took money from the NFL for his troubles (if signed).

 

Kaep certainly wasn't kneeling in his SB year, or the subsequent career year he had.   In fact, he came late to his public protests in regard to what had already transpired in the country and the BLM movement.  His activism manifested after his benching.....

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, GregPersons said:

 

People's reactions to the pig socks, I think, are the worse offense. My sister-in-law is the same way as you, it's her biggest offense to the whole thing. Her brother's a cop; her parents are out and out racists. My brother, less so, but far more willing to tolerate it, obviously. 

 

My reaction to pig socks, personally is as follows: Pig socks? Who gives a crap? Are you kidding me? People are getting murdered in the streets, for no reason, and there is no repercussions for this. It is not considered a crime. And you're quibbling over the man's footwear? White culture is so full of lies and deception, it's nightmarish, and any white people who recognize it and can speak against it, ought to, because it's disgraceful. Instead of judging another man's socks, try imaginging yourself in them, imagining yourself in the position where you felt like that expressed your feeling. Pretend you have to live someone else's life. Empathy!

 

First of all I did not equate that wearing pig socks is the same thing as people getting murdered. How you came to that conclusion is a mystery.

The pig socks do not help with the conversation. What exactly is Kaepernick's message to everyone by wearing those socks? That every member of the police force is evil? That their purpose is only to cause harm to others?

The image of him wearing those socks is a big distraction, and doesn't exactly inspire people who are trying to be understanding. 

 

To your question. Have you not looked into this at all? He has been active. Also. Why is this his responsibility alone? Why wouldn't it be okay if just raising the issue was his role and that was it? Why does he have to identify it, notify you, sacrifice his career, and then also, btw, solve a 400+ year problem that's been ignored forever, and do it before kickoff.

I have looked into this thoroughly, and again I stand by my previous question. I have not once seen Kaepernick go to any government official to work on any type of reform. You ask me why does he have to do more than just raise awareness? My response to that would be, WHY NOT? 

Is it unreasonable to ask him to do so? He brought the awareness, now shouldn't he take the next step? Imagine if he actually went to city officials and police commissioners to discuss this, to work on it. That would show real initiative and leadership.

Yet according to you, Kaepernick has done enough, so now it's up the masses to do all the hard work and make the changes. Well that is really messed up. Why shouldn't Kaepernick be the one leading? He has the bigger platform than most others.

 

Quote

 

Why are White people culturally so resistant to responsibility? They/we preach it ALL THE TIME... and yet on race... something White Culture invented and implemented... no responsibility, whatsoever. Always deferral. Always. It is so ghoulish and cowardly, I can't tell you how much it sickens me, tbh. Because it's optional. It's not necessary. White people, as a cultural force, could stop obstructing and work to be helpful to their fellow countrymen. It's really shameful, IMO, that the White race has no history of helping anyone but themselves. Imagine living in a time where maybe that would be different. It's very hard to do - da do-  da - do....

I don't know what this has to do with the subject at hand. I think that there have been numerous white people that have helped with problems in the past.

Quote

You are saying Dak donating money to the police is helpful, but just dismissing all of the money and causes and everything Kaepernick is doing... just the willingness to be so dismissive, that alone...... you're not getting it, man. You're choosing to not get it.

Oh I get it. Dak donated money to work on police reform, Kaepernick has not. That explains a lot to me.

Quote

 

So, I'm not gonna make you get it. 

 

I just want you to know, it's really easy to watch you and see you choose to not get it. You're lying to me, or you're lying to yourself, but you are making the choice. You know what you are doing.

I don't need you to make me "get it". If calling me a liar makes you feel better about yourself or if it somehow gives you the ability to claim that you are morally superior to me, fine. Give yourself that comfort.

This post has certainly taught me a lot about you.

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Why would he return.  If he comes back and sucks, it will adversely impact the narrative. 

 

I think he has more to lose than gain, unless he truly loves playing football so much he is willing to become irrelevant. 

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2 minutes ago, Mr. WEO said:

 

Now he would be another guy kneeling on the sideline.  After kickoff, he would be judged as a football player, no one would care about the rest.  Some cynics might also note that he twice took money from the NFL for his troubles (if signed).

 

Kaep certainly wasn't kneeling in his SB year, or the subsequent career year he had.   In fact, he came late to his public protests in regard to what had already transpired in the country and the BLM movement.  His activism manifested after his benching.....

 

The cynic might consider who is really taking money from who, in the larger sense, if they're looking to be even more cynical.  

The cynic might note that our willingness to default to the company's side, and assumes the company's behavior is worth defending, indicates a prisoner mentality and shows how utterly corrupted we've become by corporations on an individual level. Even when we have no stake in the matter. We're still trained well to rat each other out.

 

I can't get on board with any idea that any professional athlete is ever taking money that is undeserved, when there are owners taking far more, for doing far less. They are using their body and their skill and their name. The owners do nothing. I'd love to live to see a day where players control the leagues and collectively decide to cut owners out entirely. 

 

 

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The Chargers would be an excellent landing spot for Kaep. The Spanos family is garbage but it wouldn't surprise me if Kaep actually beat out Tyrod. I pray someone gives him a legit opportunity. Tragic it took George Floyd's life for this dialogue to happen. 

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8 minutes ago, Mark Vader said:

 

I have looked into this thoroughly, and again I stand by my previous question. I have not once seen Kaepernick go to any government official to work on any type of reform. You ask me why does he have to do more than just raise awareness? My response to that would be, WHY NOT? 

Is it unreasonable to ask him to do so? He brought the awareness, now shouldn't he take the next step? Imagine if he actually went to city officials and police commissioners to discuss this, to work on it. That would show real initiative and leadership.

 

Okay fair enough. I don't know why he hasn't, exactly, met with government officials. I know he met with activists and veterans. I'm also not sure he hasn't met with government officials. Moreso, I'm not sure what it would actually do. It seems like Kaep meeting with Nancy Pelosi would be basically an empty gesture. And nothing would happen but a photo op. If I had to guess, and I am just speculating, Kaepernick may have decided to not tie this to any specific politician.

 

Because... if Kaep meets with XZY politician... then it's kind of like the Castro shirt again. Well, then it becomes about Pelosi or whoever he meets with. It becomes, again, the conversation is picking apart Kaepernick and the idea that black people have a legitimate sentiment and request.

 

So, when I keep mentioning COINTELPRO (and there's that twitter thread you should check out) — what you'll see is ... there's a tendency in all of we should be aware of. And it's not really our fault, it's straight up conditioning.

 

But let me make this observation, and try to absorb it as truth, and then look for it around you... 

Look for this like you'd see the FedEx arrow, once you see it, you can't unsee it....

Okay here it is

 

Notice how, every time race or racism is brought up — especially with White People, but also deeply ingrained culturally — every time, our instinct is to "Mission Accomplished!" it and pat ourselves on the back, put it in a box and wrap it in a bow, with a gift card for the next generation that says "We tried!"   But it's always empty. It's JUST the box.

 

It'd in your gut. And mine. And everyone's.

The slight physical tension, the crave for release.... it's like an addiction.... we're addicted to the fantasy that racism is not real, that we in the present day hold no accountability for our society and how it came to be. 

 

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, GregPersons said:

 

The cynic might consider who is really taking money from who, in the larger sense, if they're looking to be even more cynical.  

The cynic might note that our willingness to default to the company's side, and assumes the company's behavior is worth defending, indicates a prisoner mentality and shows how utterly corrupted we've become by corporations on an individual level. Even when we have no stake in the matter. We're still trained well to rat each other out.

 

I can't get on board with any idea that any professional athlete is ever taking money that is undeserved, when there are owners taking far more, for doing far less. They are using their body and their skill and their name. The owners do nothing. I'd love to live to see a day where players control the leagues and collectively decide to cut owners out entirely. 

 

 

 

Well, this isn't really a discussion of whether capitalism and private corporate ownership should exist though, is it?  Find me an employee who doesn't think he/she  works harder than the boss/owner.

 

Players of what are essentially kids games, like employees of nearly any company/business,  are free to start their own, employee-owned similar business if they wish.  Many such companies exist if nearly every field of business in this country.

 

It would be interesting to see what would happen in a completely player-run/owned NFL.  With nearly half of each roster currently making under a million a year (cap money), how many of them would be up for a couple  of their team mates sucking up over half the cap?  I bet none.  How many league super-stars would be willing to take the 1/53rd of the cap each year as their pay?  None.  

 

Anyway, pointing out the obvious isn't "picking a side"..this is the owners' likely response to such a position proposal for Kaep.  They see him as a guy who can be paid off---they already have done so once to settle his collusion suit.  

 

 

Edited by Mr. WEO
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