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UFO Found on Ocean Floor?

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15 minutes ago, ShadyBillsFan said:

LOL

 

I wanted to post that earlier myself. 

 

Interdenominational travel 

 

4bb5e084ae8231d2ab4cb7b17308e788adc5b367

 

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9 hours ago, ShadyBillsFan said:

 

Yeah but .... Are we intelligent?  

 

 

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42 minutes ago, Deranged Rhino said:

 

Amazon has been experimenting with drone delivery.  Beerboy has a standing weekly Oreo order.....34 cases of with a gross of boxes each.  Coincidence? 

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2 hours ago, Deranged Rhino said:

From #14 on your list: 

 

Six lights in a v formation.

 

Try drawing that out.  

 

Occum's Shaver says nope.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, 4merper4mer said:

Six lights in a v formation.

 

Try drawing that out.  

 

Occum's Shaver says nope.

 

💩              💩

   💩        💩

      💩  💩

 

Edited by Bad Things
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bad Things said:

 

💩              💩

   💩        💩

      💩  💩

 

Science update:. Wishing for aliens has rendered geometry moot and turned trapezoids into triangles.

Edited by 4merper4mer

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6 hours ago, 4merper4mer said:

Six lights in a v formation.

 

Try drawing that out.  

 

Occum's Shaver says nope.

 

2 hours ago, Bad Things said:

 

💩              💩

   💩        💩

      💩  💩

 

 

 

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If the UFO’s are on the ocean floor, we should take them ALL the Brussels sprouts as a gift, and pray they don’t wipe us out in response. 

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48 minutes ago, Deranged Rhino said:

 

 

NASA's announcement will soon be followed by President's Trump pledge to Make Earth Super Again.  Buy your hats now! #MESA

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3 hours ago, Deranged Rhino said:

 

Can't wait to feel that super gravity...

 

 

pancake-productlogo_1_1200x1200.jpg

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12 hours ago, Deranged Rhino said:

 

 

LAMP

my company built that satellite 

📡 

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14 hours ago, Deranged Rhino said:

 

 

These discoveries are definitely among the coolest things man has ever done but they are equal parts brilliant and depressing.  

 

Before we discovered any of these planets, math had established that we are the only intelligent life in the universe.  This data is filling in some of the missing pieces as to why.  We needed to discover them and probably need to keep going for a bit longer but the picture that is being painted is bleak.  None of these solar systems are remotely similar to ours.  Ours, with its giant planets in the outer system and its small rocky planets inside is quite the anomaly.  Earth itself is quite unique when compared to these "super earths" which are clearly given that name as some sort of marketing ploy.  Do the conditions on that planet sounded at all like Earth?  Is it tidally locked?

 

For my money we have discovered enough solar systems to detect a trend although I can see arguments otherwise.  To me, if we are going to spend research dollars they should go toward propulsion systems capable of extra-solar travel.  These telescopes are looking for destinations and finding none.  Why propel if there is no place to go?  The more we look, the more it will damage our collective psyche and with it our will to explore.  Our destiny in this universe is becoming obvious, but it has many many steps necessary to reach its goal.  Most of these steps need to be taken without our direct involvement, although we must initiate them.    

 

I am in no way denigrating the fantastic scientists that came up with these ideas for exploration.  They did an amazing job.  Because their discoveries have not been what we would have hoped is no reason to criticize them.  Truth is truth, whether it is glorious or stark.   It is time to adapt to stark reality.  The combination of propulsion, AI and genetic distribution is our avenue to survival.  An arrogant stoner like Elon Musk who wants to walk on Mars because he thinks he is special is ultimately hindering our capabilities, not helping them.  The telescopes, while amazing are rapidly approaching the end of their marginal utility.  

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Just now, 4merper4mer said:

 

These discoveries are definitely among the coolest things man has ever done but they are equal parts brilliant and depressing.  

 

Before we discovered any of these planets, math had established that we are the only intelligent life in the universe...

 

I'll do you one better... 

 

Kepler was launched 10 years ago -- prior to its launch and subsequent work discovering exoplanets by the bundle -- the belief was that rocky planets were rare. Kepler disproved that and changed the equation for astrophysicists. The common belief went from "rocky planets are rare" to "rocky planets are more common than thought of but rocky planets with water are extraordinarily rare."

 

Five years into Kepler's work -- 2012/2013 range -- over 4,000 exoplanets had been discovered (not all by Kepler) and astronomers estimated that forty billion rocky, Earth sized exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zones of red dwarf or sun-like stars within just the Milky Way alone. Yet, water was still generally considered to be rare within the universe, let alone on such planets. 

 

Just three years ago, after numerous discoveries regarding Mars, comets and deep space exploration with ever improving telescopes and technology, the same models are being reworked to depict a universe and galaxy lush with liquid water. Not just on far away exoplanets in habitable zones, but right here in our own solar system on Mars and Titan. So much has changed with regards to the discovery of water that scientists now think water planets might be a dime a dozen. 

 

That's a massive swing in hypothesis and analysis in just a decade. We've moved from:

 

*Rocky planets are likely rare

to

* Rocky planets are common but water is rare, let alone water on rocky worlds.

to

* Water is common in the universe, water planets are likely exceedingly common

 

And the James Webb telescope has yet to launch... (March 2021 supposedly) 

 

The math equation changes as more variables become known. The elements and building block for life which were once thought to be rare are now known to be abundant not just in our cosmic neighborhood, but in our own backyard... Imagine what we'll know tomorrow. ;) :beer: 

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6 hours ago, Deranged Rhino said:

 

I'll do you one better... 

 

Kepler was launched 10 years ago -- prior to its launch and subsequent work discovering exoplanets by the bundle -- the belief was that rocky planets were rare. Kepler disproved that and changed the equation for astrophysicists. The common belief went from "rocky planets are rare" to "rocky planets are more common than thought of but rocky planets with water are extraordinarily rare."

 

Five years into Kepler's work -- 2012/2013 range -- over 4,000 exoplanets had been discovered (not all by Kepler) and astronomers estimated that forty billion rocky, Earth sized exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zones of red dwarf or sun-like stars within just the Milky Way alone. Yet, water was still generally considered to be rare within the universe, let alone on such planets. 

 

Just three years ago, after numerous discoveries regarding Mars, comets and deep space exploration with ever improving telescopes and technology, the same models are being reworked to depict a universe and galaxy lush with liquid water. Not just on far away exoplanets in habitable zones, but right here in our own solar system on Mars and Titan. So much has changed with regards to the discovery of water that scientists now think water planets might be a dime a dozen. 

 

That's a massive swing in hypothesis and analysis in just a decade. We've moved from:

 

*Rocky planets are likely rare

to

* Rocky planets are common but water is rare, let alone water on rocky worlds.

to

* Water is common in the universe, water planets are likely exceedingly common

 

And the James Webb telescope has yet to launch... (March 2021 supposedly) 

 

The math equation changes as more variables become known. The elements and building block for life which were once thought to be rare are now known to be abundant not just in our cosmic neighborhood, but in our own backyard... Imagine what we'll know tomorrow. ;) :beer: 

There is no question that we are finding not only many interesting things but many questions about how much further we should look. Despite your spin implying intelligent life has become more likely it simply hasn't.  Sitcom math still rules the day as trillions of signals have been collected with a grand total of zero coming from life.  

 

We've discovered that our protected Earth and the Solar System in which it resides are, so far, completely unique with nothing close to them being observed.  We know far more now than when Kepler was launched about the collision that created the Earth and Moon's dance and how critical that is to life thriving.  There are thousands upon thousands of other factors that make Earth what it is and math shows these factors are singular.

 

The question...really the only one that matters.....is whether we have the resolve to stop searching the skies for extraterrestrial heroes that simply do not exist and instead apply our knowledge towards preserving ourselves.  The story of Noah and the wisdom and insight of Von Neumann show the way.  The arrogance of people like Musk and Branson is wasting our time.  Humans, once born on Earth should really stay in this neighborhood.  

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Deranged Rhino said:

 

I'll do you one better... 

 

Kepler was launched 10 years ago -- prior to its launch and subsequent work discovering exoplanets by the bundle -- the belief was that rocky planets were rare. Kepler disproved that and changed the equation for astrophysicists. The common belief went from "rocky planets are rare" to "rocky planets are more common than thought of but rocky planets with water are extraordinarily rare."

 

Five years into Kepler's work -- 2012/2013 range -- over 4,000 exoplanets had been discovered (not all by Kepler) and astronomers estimated that forty billion rocky, Earth sized exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zones of red dwarf or sun-like stars within just the Milky Way alone. Yet, water was still generally considered to be rare within the universe, let alone on such planets. 

 

Just three years ago, after numerous discoveries regarding Mars, comets and deep space exploration with ever improving telescopes and technology, the same models are being reworked to depict a universe and galaxy lush with liquid water. Not just on far away exoplanets in habitable zones, but right here in our own solar system on Mars and Titan. So much has changed with regards to the discovery of water that scientists now think water planets might be a dime a dozen. 

 

That's a massive swing in hypothesis and analysis in just a decade. We've moved from:

 

*Rocky planets are likely rare

to

* Rocky planets are common but water is rare, let alone water on rocky worlds.

to

* Water is common in the universe, water planets are likely exceedingly common

 

And the James Webb telescope has yet to launch... (March 2021 supposedly) 

 

The math equation changes as more variables become known. The elements and building block for life which were once thought to be rare are now known to be abundant not just in our cosmic neighborhood, but in our own backyard... Imagine what we'll know tomorrow. ;) :beer: 

 

Good post and very true. Tis why those calculations are limited and prove nothing. In the future they could find all sorts of interesting stuff on one of these planets they keep finding and maybe life of some sort. Very interesting read. Thanks

Edited by Patrick_Duffy
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1 hour ago, 4merper4mer said:

There is no question that we are finding not only many interesting things but many questions about how much further we should look. Despite your spin implying intelligent life has become more likely it simply hasn't.  Sitcom math still rules the day as trillions of signals have been collected with a grand total of zero coming from life.  

 

We've discovered that our protected Earth and the Solar System in which it resides are, so far, completely unique with nothing close to them being observed.  We know far more now than when Kepler was launched about the collision that created the Earth and Moon's dance and how critical that is to life thriving.  There are thousands upon thousands of other factors that make Earth what it is and math shows these factors are singular.

 

The question...really the only one that matters.....is whether we have the resolve to stop searching the skies for extraterrestrial heroes that simply do not exist and instead apply our knowledge towards preserving ourselves.  The story of Noah and the wisdom and insight of Von Neumann show the way.  The arrogance of people like Musk and Branson is wasting our time.  Humans, once born on Earth should really stay in this neighborhood.  

Rhino's post shows why they should continue to search and need to be doing both: identifying a habitable planet and developing an efficient way to get there.

 

P.S. - "Noah" was likely a member of a civilization with technology far more advanced than what we currently have. He was able to construct a ship that held two of every animal on his planet and was able to propel that massive ship. Granted, it probably wasn't every animal, or he simply acquired DNA samples for many species. I say "his planet" because he likely was not on Earth originally. As his planet was dying, he fled into space without knowing where he would land. Along the way he identified what we now know as Earth. The dove with the olive branch was likely a metaphor for the drone he sent to nearby planets in order to collect samples before he landed there. Sensor readings from a distance would only tell him so much, after all. He landed, let the animals loose, used the ship for scraps as he had no way of keeping it powered or getting off the planet again, and he and his family eventually died without successfully passing on much technical knowledge to indigenous Earthlings, because there was no way to even use it in that primitive time. Noah and his family would've learned more from the Earthlings than the Earthlings would from them.

 

This was all adapted into a story that primitive Earth people could understand ....obviously.

 

Furthermore, I propose that Noah's planet died from being consumed by its parent star. "Flooded" with fire, not water. His ship likely used solar wind to travel. But how would he explain this to primitive Earthlings? He had to describe it like floating/riding on a liquid. Therefore, the story became that the planet was flooded with water and Noah's ark rode its waves on a boat until it hit land.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRkNciSk51OdrSP4XXOnfC

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9 hours ago, 4merper4mer said:

 

These discoveries are definitely among the coolest things man has ever done but they are equal parts brilliant and depressing.  

 

Before we discovered any of these planets, math had established that we are the only intelligent life in the universe.  This data is filling in some of the missing pieces as to why.  We needed to discover them and probably need to keep going for a bit longer but the picture that is being painted is bleak.  None of these solar systems are remotely similar to ours.  Ours, with its giant planets in the outer system and its small rocky planets inside is quite the anomaly.  Earth itself is quite unique when compared to these "super earths" which are clearly given that name as some sort of marketing ploy.  Do the conditions on that planet sounded at all like Earth?  Is it tidally locked?

 

For my money we have discovered enough solar systems to detect a trend although I can see arguments otherwise.  To me, if we are going to spend research dollars they should go toward propulsion systems capable of extra-solar travel.  These telescopes are looking for destinations and finding none.  Why propel if there is no place to go?  The more we look, the more it will damage our collective psyche and with it our will to explore.  Our destiny in this universe is becoming obvious, but it has many many steps necessary to reach its goal.  Most of these steps need to be taken without our direct involvement, although we must initiate them.    

 

I am in no way denigrating the fantastic scientists that came up with these ideas for exploration.  They did an amazing job.  Because their discoveries have not been what we would have hoped is no reason to criticize them.  Truth is truth, whether it is glorious or stark.   It is time to adapt to stark reality.  The combination of propulsion, AI and genetic distribution is our avenue to survival.  An arrogant stoner like Elon Musk who wants to walk on Mars because he thinks he is special is ultimately hindering our capabilities, not helping them.  The telescopes, while amazing are rapidly approaching the end of their marginal utility.  

au contraire my friend, freezie pops.

 

Earth is a very young planet. ever wonder why the continents look like puzzle pieces that fit together? because at one time, they did... back when the Earth was very tiny (in celestial terms of course). dinosaurs roamed the Earth when it was smaller than it is now, the lessor gravity of a smaller sphere allowed for larger mammals back then. man is progressively getting shorter and shorter... because the Earth is ever expanding thanks to the plasma core. 

 

just think, some day in the distant future we will be as mighty as ants on a planet as large as Jupiter.

now you know why we can't detect intelligent alien life signals, because we are looking in all the wrong places....

 

 

👽

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22 minutes ago, Foxx said:

au contraire my friend, freezie pops.

 

Earth is a very young planet. ever wonder why the continents look like puzzle pieces that fit together? because at one time, they did... back when the Earth was very tiny (in celestial terms of course). dinosaurs roamed the Earth when it was smaller than it is now, the lessor gravity of a smaller sphere allowed for larger mammals back then. man is progressively getting shorter and shorter... because the Earth is ever expanding thanks to the plasma core. 

 

just think, some day in the distant future we will be as mighty as ants on a planet as large as Jupiter.

now you know why we can't detect intelligent alien life signals, because we are looking in all the wrong places....

 

 

👽

cmPXIfa5_400x400.jpg

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