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Woman ducted tape to seat on American Airlines flight. Attacked flight attendants and tried to open the door.


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23 hours ago, sherpa said:

I always wonder when, if ever, people will understand that you cannot open a door in flight.

I heard a story from a reliable source that an ex-Bills player was afraid of flying and tried to open the door once.  A team rep was assigned to stop him from attempting this on all future flights.

Edited by JÂy RÛßeÒ
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2 hours ago, Seasons1992 said:

 

What about lock gates on waterways? Can you expound on the possibilities for that? 

 

Asking for a friend @BringBackFergy

Yes.  The miter gate variety is like a pressurized airplane door.   When there's difference of water (head) on either side of them, it would take a strongman to open them.   BUT equalize the pressure and a lady in high heels can swing them... NOW sector gates, they can be open against the pressure of the head, because one side is angled or curved, equally displacing the amount of pressure being applied the gate holding it shut (ie: acts like a cam).

 

😆🤣😂You CAN open the gates if you equalize the pressure, but you may NOT open the gates!

 

😏

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On 7/14/2021 at 10:54 AM, dpberr said:

I don't have a problem with restraining someone who's tried opening an airplane door.  I do have a problem with the tape over the mouth though.  If the crew gets reprimanded for anything in this particular situation, it's going to be that detail.  

 

I think people who try to open doors mid-flight, charge the cockpit, and other let's crash the plane chicanery should face a mandatory jail sentence, mental health episode or not.  

 

Allegedly, she bit a flight attendent, injurying him/her

 

1 hour ago, JÂy RÛßeÒ said:

I heard a story from a reliable source that an ex-Bills player was afraid of flying and tried to open the door once.  A team rep was assigned to stop him from attempting this on all future flights.

 

I believe this was Kiko Alonzo and the team took other steps as well such as arranging for him to get a cockpit tour and ride jumpseat so he could build confidence.  Allegedly it helped.

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19 hours ago, unbillievable said:

 

I always wondered about that, since interior pressure would be greater, I assumed it would aid in opening the door.

...but apparently it has to do with the plane fuselage changing shape. Which is even scarier.

 

The door won't open in flight because of the design of the door.

 

Pressure hull aircraft doors are designed as plug doors - the door is actually larger than the fuselage opening.  So it has to swing IN first, then rotate in some dimension (sideways or up) to swing through the smaller fuselage opening.  That means the greater interior pressure works against opening the door. 

Same thing true of emergency windows - that's why the instructions say to pull the window IN first

 

The fuselage does change shape in flight but that's materials science - the inevitable effects of temperature on the size of metals, for example - it's not what's holding the door closed.

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14 minutes ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

 

The door won't open in flight because of the design of the door.

 

Pressure hull aircraft doors are designed as plug doors - the door is actually larger than the fuselage opening.  So it has to swing IN first, then rotate in some dimension (sideways or up) to swing through the smaller fuselage opening.  

 

That was completely covered in a post 10 hours ago.

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1 minute ago, Mike in Horseheads said:

It when your wife throws a roll of tape at your head and you "ducted' because of tape

 

 

My wife grabbed the biggest knife in the house.  Duct tape is child's play.

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12 minutes ago, ExiledInIllinois said:

Unless cabin pressure is lost. 

 

What?

The door is opened on every single flight.

 

That's how the good folks get out.

Airplane pulls up to the gate.

Gate agent pulls the jet bridge up.

Flight attendants disarm the slides at each slide equipped door.

Agent bangs on the front door to indicate bridge is in place.

Flight attendant signals with thumbs up through the window.

Agent opens the door from the outside, which is way easier than doing it from the inside.

 

On landing, without going into boring detail, the cabin depressurizes. It actually does this gradually as part of the descent schedule so you don't blow heads off when you land.

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1 hour ago, sherpa said:

 

That was completely covered in a post 10 hours ago.

 

What's Your Point?  

 

People respond to posts they see without reading through the rest of the thread to see if someone else gave a good answer all the time.

It's not something we try to control as usually (as true in this instance) there is a different explanation or some additional/different information.

Different explanations work better for different people.

 

Why post just to say that?  It either seems personal or snarky.

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9 minutes ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

Why post just to say that?  It either seems personal or snarky.

 

It is neither.

It's just that the exact same post was quoted and responded to earlier.

Sorry you took it as a slight.

I have no personal nor snarky emotions about anything or anyone here.

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On 7/14/2021 at 12:37 PM, ExiledInIllinois said:

Then let he have at it.  Nothing to worry about. 😏

 

 

Um, No. 

 

Just because the door itself can't be opened in flight, does not mean you let a crazy person rampage around grabbing whatever they can get their hands on and ASSuming they can't somehow find a way to inflict damage on the door mechanism, some other part of the plane, or get their hands on something that would allow them to damage crew or passengers.

 

Aircraft work amazingly well and reliably for complicated systems, but ordinary passenger aircraft were not overall designed to be resistant against deliberate attempts at damage from out-of-control passengers.  They rely upon the passengers to be well-behaved and compliant with crew instructions.

8 minutes ago, sherpa said:

 

It is neither.

It's just that the exact same post was quoted and responded to earlier.

Sorry you took it as a slight.

I have no personal nor snarky emotions about anything or anyone here.

 

Fair enough. 

 

Be aware that multiple responses to the exact same post are neither rare here, nor considered a problem worth comment unless they are factually incorrect.  Which is why it struck me as unusual.

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1 hour ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

 

Um, No. 

 

Just because the door itself can't be opened in flight, does not mean you let a crazy person rampage around grabbing whatever they can get their hands on and ASSuming they can't somehow find a way to inflict damage on the door mechanism, some other part of the plane, or get their hands on something that would allow them to damage crew or passengers.

 

Aircraft work amazingly well and reliably for complicated systems, but ordinary passenger aircraft were not overall designed to be resistant against deliberate attempts at damage from out-of-control passengers.  They rely upon the passengers to be well-behaved and compliant with crew instructions.

 

Fair enough. 

 

Be aware that multiple responses to the exact same post are neither rare here, nor considered a problem worth comment unless they are factually incorrect.  Which is why it struck me as unusual.

I guess you missed my sarcasm. 😏

 

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30 minutes ago, unbillievable said:

At what altitude will the pressure equalize enough to open the door?

I'm guessing 10k feet. That seems to be the altitude they use the most in movies. 

 

 

 

No.

There is a pressure differential until the weight is on the gear.

Once that happens, the airplane knows it is on the ground and opens the outflow valve, reducing the psi differential to zero.

Only then can the doors be opened.

It also pre-pressurizes to a small degree on takeoff.

 

A few other things as this thing winds down.

Regarding this specific event, if someone messes with a door, depending on what they do, there will be an alert message in the cockpit. A screen will pop up showing which door is not safely latched. Depending on a number of things, and how that alert is judged, could cause a number of other actions.

Second, airline crews are taught to never assume that one event in the cabin is a solo event involving one person.

One misbehaving passenger is not assumed to be the only thing going on.

 

 

 

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