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I realized there were no book threads. Don't we have readers here? Where are we? What are we reading? I always look for new suggestions. The truth is, I am an English teacher and teach upper-level English students, so my liesure reading stuff ends up being "fluff."

 

So despite the fact that my favorite all-time book is Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig, I have been reading a ton of Stephen King lately. Right now I'm on book 3 of The Dark Tower series, but over the last few years I've also read his newest books The Outsider and The Institute and Sleeping Beauties along with some of his classics like The Shining and Salem's Lot, and The Stand... I loved all of them. I firmly believe King belongs in the Canon... he's the modern Hemingway.

 

I usually read one nonfiction book simultaneously with a fiction book. I guess that must be my ADD... so I've also read a good amount of nonfiction. I'm not bringing up all of the titles because some of them are political, but I also love reading surfing memoirs and different types of philosophy or logic books. I think my favorite recent non-fiction book is called Surfing with Sartre. It's a philosophy book that essentially connects surfing with academic philosophy.

 

I would love some suggestions... or just to hear what you guys are reading.

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I realized there were no book threads. Don't we have readers here? Where are we? What are we reading? I always look for new suggestions. The truth is, I am an English teacher and teach upper-level Eng

I really need a print version of a book to read.  I have a tablet but would never be able to tolerate reading on one.  I think the only thing I would ever consider is the Kindle Paper-White because it

What's a book?

Went wild reading Stephen King in the '80's. 'The Stand' was my favorite. Ironically, you mentioned Hemingway, just started 'A Farewell To Arms'.

 

Recently read 'The Grapes of Wrath', like all books, better than the movie. The ending mind blowing, to me.

 

My wife is in a book club, covid has tampered down their get togethers. She gets so mad that I scoff at what they read.

 

Like your idea, but guys sharing book readings and suggestions probably would drop like a rock in the threads. Hope I'm wrong.

 

Thank you for such a positive sound proposal. Seriously.

 

The Collected Works of Nathanael West was surreal for 1930's literature. 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, I am the egg man said:

Went wild reading Stephen King in the '80's. 'The Stand' was my favorite.

 

Ironically, you mentioned Hemingway, just started reading 'Farewell To Arms'.

 

Recently read 'The Grapes of Wrath', like all movies the book was better, by far, the ending mind blowing, to me.

 

My wife is in a book club, covid has tampered down their get togethers. She gets so mad that I scoff at what they read.

 

Like your idea, but guys sharing book readings and suggestions probably would drop like a rock in the threads.

 

Hope I'm wrong. Thank you for such a sound proposal.

 

Would she happen to be in Baker Mayfield’s book club? Is she the one who got voted out??? 

 

One of the highlights of my day is going to lunch and reading my current book. They recognize me when I come in and bring my Arnold Palmer.  Sometimes they tell me they have already put my order in....BEFORE I have ordered. I am a creature of habit. 

 

I don’t read anything too deep, for the most part. Just page turners. It’s getting late for me, so I’ll be back to push this thread back up down the road. 

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44 minutes ago, transplantbillsfan said:

I realized there were no book threads. Don't we have readers here? Where are we? What are we reading? I always look for new suggestions. The truth is, I am an English teacher and teach upper-level English students, so my liesure reading stuff ends up being "fluff."

 

So despite the fact that my favorite all-time book is Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig, I have been reading a ton of Stephen King lately. Right now I'm on book 3 of The Dark Tower series, but over the last few years I've also read his newest books The Outsider and The Institute and Sleeping Beauties along with some of his classics like The Shining and Salem's Lot, and The Stand... I loved all of them. I firmly believe King belongs in the Canon... he's the modern Hemingway.

 

I usually read one nonfiction book simultaneously with a fiction book. I guess that must be my ADD... so I've also read a good amount of nonfiction. I'm not bringing up all of the titles because some of them are political, but I also love reading surfing memoirs and different types of philosophy or logic books. I think my favorite recent non-fiction book is called Surfing with Sartre. It's a philosophy book that essentially connects surfing with academic philosophy.

 

I would love some suggestions... or just to hear what you guys are reading.

 

When I was in the Navy, I hurt my back and was given 7 days of bed rest.  I read, "Needful Things," during those seven days.  Couldn't put it down.

 

I've also read a solid dozen of Dean Koonz's books.  Earlier the better.

 

For a nice easy read, I highly recommend anything by Mitch Albom.  Wonderfully written, thought-provoking, books.

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, transplantbillsfan said:

I realized there were no book threads. Don't we have readers here? Where are we? What are we reading? I always look for new suggestions. The truth is, I am an English teacher and teach upper-level English students, so my liesure reading stuff ends up being "fluff."

 

So despite the fact that my favorite all-time book is Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig, I have been reading a ton of Stephen King lately. Right now I'm on book 3 of The Dark Tower series, but over the last few years I've also read his newest books The Outsider and The Institute and Sleeping Beauties along with some of his classics like The Shining and Salem's Lot, and The Stand... I loved all of them. I firmly believe King belongs in the Canon... he's the modern Hemingway.

 

I usually read one nonfiction book simultaneously with a fiction book. I guess that must be my ADD... so I've also read a good amount of nonfiction. I'm not bringing up all of the titles because some of them are political, but I also love reading surfing memoirs and different types of philosophy or logic books. I think my favorite recent non-fiction book is called Surfing with Sartre. It's a philosophy book that essentially connects surfing with academic philosophy.

 

I would love some suggestions... or just to hear what you guys are reading.

We have the same favorite book!  Did you ever read Pirsig’s follow up, Lila?  I loved that as well.  I am reading a ton of food and cooking books now - Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat is quite good.  It Was All a Lie by Stuart Stevens is up next in non fiction. I usually gravitate to behavioral economics and the like for stimulating fun.  Levit and Dubner’s books like Freakonomics, just about any Malcolm Gladwell book, The Black Swan by Taleb, etc. are all great reads.  Id be that you’ve already read these, but you can’t go wrong with The Life of Pi or Kite Runner if you haven’t gotten to those fantastic reads yet. 

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Have you ever read latin american authors?

I'm mexican and not so good in english, 

that's why I don't read in english and most of my readings are of those authors, and classics, like  Dickens, Dostoyevsky, Balzac(😍) and recently i read east of eden  and grapes of wrath and want to read more of Steinbeck.

all this without being an avid reader.

 

 

 

 

 

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Good thread idea. 

Having been furloughed for about a year now, I've been doing an absurd amount of reading. As such:

Logic's Current Top Five Favorite Books of All Time (which might change by next week):

1. Be Here Now by Ram Dass
2. Grist for the Mill by Ram Dass
3. The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are by Alan Watts

4. Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac 

5. The Cosmic Trigger by Robert Anton Wilson

I know, I know. You're absolutely shocked that a guy with a Grateful Dead avatar is into Ram Dass and Kerouac and Watts. 

 

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Stephen King has a very particular voice in his writing that I personally can't get past.  I just can't read his books, and I've tried a few of them.

 

In fiction, I'm currently reading "Pope Joan" by Donna Woolfolk Cross.  Great book and super interesting.  

 

In non-fiction, I'm reading "The First and the Last" by Adolf Galland. 

 

 

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15 hours ago, transplantbillsfan said:

I realized there were no book threads. Don't we have readers here? Where are we? What are we reading? I always look for new suggestions. The truth is, I am an English teacher and teach upper-level English students, so my liesure reading stuff ends up being "fluff."

 

So despite the fact that my favorite all-time book is Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig, I have been reading a ton of Stephen King lately. Right now I'm on book 3 of The Dark Tower series, but over the last few years I've also read his newest books The Outsider and The Institute and Sleeping Beauties along with some of his classics like The Shining and Salem's Lot, and The Stand... I loved all of them. I firmly believe King belongs in the Canon... he's the modern Hemingway.

 

I usually read one nonfiction book simultaneously with a fiction book. I guess that must be my ADD... so I've also read a good amount of nonfiction. I'm not bringing up all of the titles because some of them are political, but I also love reading surfing memoirs and different types of philosophy or logic books. I think my favorite recent non-fiction book is called Surfing with Sartre. It's a philosophy book that essentially connects surfing with academic philosophy.

 

I would love some suggestions... or just to hear what you guys are reading.

 

I don't like Stephen King, but I did read his book on writing--aptly titled "On Writing"-- and it was great. Great insight into his process as a writer. As an English teacher, I am sure you would enjoy it.

 

 

Here are a few recommendations-- both Fiction and Non-Fiction:

 

1) "Body & Soul" by Frank Conroy.  My all-time favorite fiction book-- coming of age story of a piano prodigy.  

2) I am a big fan of foreign-author fiction, and particularly like Ha Jin, and Jhumpa Lahiri.  Everything by them is great, but "Waiting" is Ha Jin's classic, and probably "Interpreter of Maladies" is Lahiri's best work (I think she won a pulitzer for it).

3) In terms of non-fiction, I am a big fan of some of Johnathon Haidt's recent stuff, including "Coddling of the American Mind" and "Righteous Mind."  Haidt is a liberal moral psych professor from UVA, but his work really resonates with liberals and conservatives. If you have kids in college or heading to college, Coddling is a must-read. 

 

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16 hours ago, I am the egg man said:

Went wild reading Stephen King in the '80's. 'The Stand' was my favorite.

 

Ironically, you mentioned Hemingway, just started reading 'A Farewell To Arms'.

 

Recently read 'The Grapes of Wrath', like all books, better than the movie. The ending mind blowing, to me.

 

My wife is in a book club, covid has tampered down their get togethers. She gets so mad that I scoff at what they read.

 

Like your idea, but guys sharing book readings and suggestions probably would drop like a rock in the threads.

 

Hope I'm wrong. Thank you for such a positive sound proposal.

 

Seriously.

 

Since I teach English, my "free reading" stuff at this point is generally just "fluff."  That said, I became an English teacher because I love literature.  I never really loved Steinbeck as an author.  Brave New World, Fahrenheit 451Catcher in the Rye, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest are probably my favorite books to teach because I actually love the books. King Lear is by far my favorite Shakespeare play and probably one of my 5 favorite works overall.  Ayn Rand is polarizing as a writer. The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged are page-turners at least, but I really get annoyed at how much she just bashes you over the head with her ideas and since her characters are really just symbolic representations of her ideas, it's impossible to connect with them.  I actually assign Atlas Shrugged to my AP Lit students for their Summer read just because of how polarizing it is and I find it an interesting way to start the year.

 

I'm honestly loving Stephen King.  I had read some of his books when I was younger like The Dark Half, but over the last few years I've just kinda decided to try to go through as many of his works as possible since I always seem to enjoy his books.... he puts you in the minds of the characters better than most writers... and I think that's often why movies adapted from his books in particular are never nearly as good.  One of his lesser known works is called Revival and it might be the scariest Stephen King book in terms of the way it ends... but the entirety of the book is really just character building, which I loved.

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3 hours ago, \GoBillsInDallas/ said:

 

What's a book?

 

It’s a cousin of the newspaper. The family reunions are a hoot! 

 

I think the three books I’ve intentionally read twice were Catch-22, The Winter of Our Discontent and Travels With Charlie. Two out of three are Steinbeck, so I guess I like him. 

 

My absolute favorite, however, is John Grisham. I think I’ve read everything he’s ever published, including the Theodore Boone kids books. Playing for Pizza was a great book and football related. Very different for Grisham and a great read with some humor. His latest (I believe) is A Time For Mercy which I recently finished. Same characters and setting in general as A Time To Kill and is supposed to be about 5 years later. It has some loose ends and clearly calls for a follow up which can’t come out soon enough. 

 

I generally read light stuff during lunch every day like Grisham, Baldacci, some Patterson (depending upon who the actual author was!), etc. I have my regular restaurants where I’m the strange man who walks in with his book and almost always order the same thing. They bring out my Arnold Palmer as I sit down and ask “the usual, again?” Yep! 

 

I’ll read more educational or semi-spiritual stuff around the house, but not daily like the lunch books. I had to read some books about near death experiences in high school at St Joes and I’ll still read those when I find one that looks interesting. I’m generally not trying to impress anyone with my subject matter or improve myself as a person (unlike my wife who constantly has a self improvement/motivational book on the night stand), I just enjoy reading regularly. 

 

We have too many books on the bookshelves so I box them up and take them to the library at the retirement home my mother lives at. Sitting on a shelf they do no good. I like to be able to share them as they are generally more current and of better quality than what they have available. Books are to be shared and enjoyed, not stored in a box or on a shelf.  

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I've read a lot of books in my life so its hard to name a favorite. Always liked Bradbury's short stories compiled into book form... Golden Apples of the Sun, etc.

 

The Electric Kool-aid Acid Test is a pretty good read, as well as On The Road.

 

Anything by Hunter Thompson or Tolkien.

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16 hours ago, Gugny said:

 

When I was in the Navy, I hurt my back and was given 7 days of bed rest.  I read, "Needful Things," during those seven days.  Couldn't put it down.

 

I've also read a solid dozen of Dean Koonz's books.  Earlier the better.

 

For a nice easy read, I highly recommend anything by Mitch Albom.  Wonderfully written, thought-provoking, books.

 

 

 

 

 

Dean Koontz was my first favorite writer.  I've probably read more of his books overall than any other writer.  Loved Watchers, Whispers and The Taking... among others.  You're right about his earlier books being better.  I haven't liked the direction he's gone as a writer overall.

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42 minutes ago, Augie said:

 

It’s a cousin of the newspaper. The family reunions are a hoot! 

 

I think the three books I’ve intentionally read twice were Catch-22, The Winter of Our Discontent and Travels With Charlie. Two out of three are Steinbeck, so I guess I like him. 

 

My absolute favorite, however, is John Grisham. I think I’ve read everything he’s ever published, including the Theodore Boone kids books. Playing for Pizza was a great book and football related. Very different for Grisham and a great read with some humor. His latest (I believe) is A Time For Mercy which I recently finished. Same characters and setting in general as A Time To Kill and is supposed to be about 5 years later. It has some loose ends and clearly calls for a follow up which can’t come out soon enough. 

 

I generally read light stuff during lunch every day like Grisham, Baldacci, some Patterson (depending upon who the actual author was!), etc. I have my regular restaurants where I’m the strange man who walks in with his book and almost always order the same thing. They bring out my Arnold Palmer as I sit down and ask “the usual, again?” Yep! 

 

I’ll read more educational or semi-spiritual stuff around the house, but not daily like the lunch books. I had to read some books about near death experiences in high school at St Joes and I’ll still read those when I find one that looks interesting. I’m generally not trying to impress anyone with my subject matter or improve myself as a person (unlike my wife who constantly has a self improvement/motivational book on the night stand), I just enjoy reading regularly. 

 

We have too many books on the bookshelves so I box them up and take them to the library at the retirement home my mother lives at. Sitting on a shelf they do no good. I like to be able to share them as they are generally more current and of better quality than what they have available. Books are to be shared and enjoyed, not stored in a box or on a shelf.  


Re Grisham, I have read a handful of his books over the years, but my wife has read everyone. 
 

What I find interesting about Grisham is how he started off. He was a lawyer,  but wanted to be a novelist, and I think he said, “I am committing to write at least 1 page per day.” That’s what he did and how he wrote his first novel, A Time to Kill. As someone who has tried to write novels and have never had the discipline to finish, I always thought that was a really great Approach.

 

the other thing I like about Grisham is that he doesn’t take himself Too seriously. He knows he writes pretty formulaic legal books for beach reads etc, not high-brow literature. he knows what he is good at it and who is audience is, And I find that to be pretty refreshing. 

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16 hours ago, Limeaid said:

Most of my favorite authors are gone or are no longer writing.  I have tried books on line and find them too difficult for my vision despite me being on computer all day for work and other things.   Occasionally when I am on a long trip alone I'd borrow books on CD from library (only input my car has besides radio) and I'd aim for longer books which matched my expected travel time but these days I rarely travel alone long distances and with my wife driving not practical for they make her fall asleep.

 

 

I really need a print version of a book to read.  I have a tablet but would never be able to tolerate reading on one.  I think the only thing I would ever consider is the Kindle Paper-White because it seems easy on the eyes.  But there's something about having a print version of a book and just seeing your progress as you read.

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9 hours ago, BarleyNY said:

We have the same favorite book!  Did you ever read Pirsig’s follow up, Lila?  I loved that as well.  I am reading a ton of food and cooking books now - Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat is quite good.  It Was All a Lie by Stuart Stevens is up next in non fiction. I usually gravitate to behavioral economics and the like for stimulating fun.  Levit and Dubner’s books like Freakonomics, just about any Malcolm Gladwell book, The Black Swan by Taleb, etc. are all great reads.  Id be that you’ve already read these, but you can’t go wrong with The Life of Pi or Kite Runner if you haven’t gotten to those fantastic reads yet. 

 

Sounds like we have similar tastes.

 

I haven't read Lila.  You say it's a follow up?  Same storyline?  Same philosophical meanderings?  As a surfer I've really liked surf books that have explored similar philosophical ideas.... that's why I mentioned Surfing with Sartre, but there's a book called Saltwater Buddha by Jaimal Yogis that really reminded me of Pirsig's book, though not nearly as academic in writing.  Yogis actually writes a non-fiction book called The Fear Project that's actually super interesting and not just about surfing but is more an exploration of our fear and how we deal with it.

 

I've been making my way through Gladwell's books, too.  Outliers was the best among them. I'm actually stalled right now in the middle of his book Blink because I've been devouring King's Dark Tower books, though.

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4 minutes ago, Miyagi-Do Karate said:


Re Grisham, I have read a handful of his books over the years, but my wife has read everyone. 
 

What I find interesting about Grisham is how he started off. He was a lawyer,  but wanted to be a novelist, and I think he said, “I am committing to write at least 1 page per day.” That’s what he did and how he wrote his first novel, A Time to Kill. As someone who has tried to write novels and have never had the discipline to finish, I always thought that was a really great Approach.

 

the other thing I like about Grisham is that he doesn’t take himself Too seriously. He knows he writes pretty formulaic legal books for beach reads etc, not high-brow literature. he knows what he is good at it and who is audience is, And I find that to be pretty refreshing. 

 

Exactly, when I say I like him it doesn’t sound like I’m bragging about my lofty literally standards. It’s just what I like, a nice easy and entertaining read. I’ve moved more and more away from Patterson as he’s clearly just a factory with all those other “co-authors”.  In an interview MANY years ago someone asked Patterson if he really made $65 million/year. He just smiled and said “that’s in the ballpark.”  He’s all about the money where I think Grisham still cares more about his product. 

 

On another note, on a recent drive to Florida we listened to Red Notice on audio. THAT is an incredible story which is supposedly factual about corruption, murder and Oligarchs in Russia. I usually can’t do audio books because my mind wanders and I lose track but NOT the case here. It is absolutely remarkable, mostly because it’s apparently fairly accurate. He gets bogged down in technical details a little, but it’s still an amazing and eye opening story about a horribly corrupt country. It also ties into factual American politics and why some things happened the way they did in our country. Shocking! Anyone else read this? 

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