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Bills “Growth Mindset” series premieres March 11


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McDermott likes the concept of “Growth Mindset.”   You often hear this expression when he talks: “We embrace that growth mindset…”   When Beane and McD evaluate college players and available FAs, one of the qualities they’re looking for is a growth mindset.   That's why the documentary has that name.

 

For those who may not know, the expression “Growth Mindset” was coined by Stanford psychologist, Carol Dweck, and popularized in her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.  In a nutshell, she says people can be divided into two groups: people with Fixed Mindsets and people with Growth Mindsets. 

 

People with fixed mindsets don’t see future growth on their horizons.  “This is who I am, get used to it!”  Or, “I have a bad temper.  That’s just who I am.”

 

But people with growth mindsets see themselves as forever malleable and capable of new growth. 

 

If you want to know what children in school will achieve the most in life, don’t look at IQ.  Look at mindset.  People with growth mindsets accomplish more because they don’t put false ceilings on themselves or see themselves cast in concrete.  They’re always looking for ways to learn and grow. 

 

And that’s the mindset McD wants to see on the Bills.    

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16 hours ago, hondo in seattle said:

McDermott likes the concept of “Growth Mindset.”   You often hear this expression when he talks: “We embrace that growth mindset…”   When Beane and McD evaluate college players and available FAs, one of the qualities they’re looking for is a growth mindset.   That's why the documentary has that name.

 

For those who may not know, the expression “Growth Mindset” was coined by Stanford psychologist, Carol Dweck, and popularized in her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.  In a nutshell, she says people can be divided into two groups: people with Fixed Mindsets and people with Growth Mindsets. 

 

People with fixed mindsets don’t see future growth on their horizons.  “This is who I am, get used to it!”  Or, “I have a bad temper.  That’s just who I am.”

 

But people with growth mindsets see themselves as forever malleable and capable of new growth. 

 

If you want to know what children in school will achieve the most in life, don’t look at IQ.  Look at mindset.  People with growth mindsets accomplish more because they don’t put false ceilings on themselves or see themselves cast in concrete.  They’re always looking for ways to learn and grow. 

 

And that’s the mindset McD wants to see on the Bills.    

 

 

Yup. She comes from a teaching background and came up with this stuff in experiments on kids. But it was a case of a universal phenomena showing up in one group, kids.

 

I use this on my kid all the time. Dweck advises you to never say stuff like, "You're so smart." Or "you're really good at that." Because then you're complimenting their talent and when they reach a situation where they fail they think, "Oh, I'm doomed, I'm not talented enough.

 

Whereas if you compliment them by saying, "Oh, you worked so hard," or, "Oh, you tried a new way there, didn't you? That's great, you're really trying to think in new ways. That's really good," then if they fail they think, "Well, if I keep working and trying new ways, I'll eventually get it.

 

I constantly remind myself to be doing this with my 5 year-old.

 

Dweck has a good TED talk where she tells about this far better than I can. And all in under 10 minutes.

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, hondo in seattle said:

McDermott likes the concept of “Growth Mindset.”   You often hear this expression when he talks: “We embrace that growth mindset…”   When Beane and McD evaluate college players and available FAs, one of the qualities they’re looking for is a growth mindset.   That's why the documentary has that name.

 

For those who may not know, the expression “Growth Mindset” was coined by Stanford psychologist, Carol Dweck, and popularized in her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.  In a nutshell, she says people can be divided into two groups: people with Fixed Mindsets and people with Growth Mindsets. 

 

People with fixed mindsets don’t see future growth on their horizons.  “This is who I am, get used to it!”  Or, “I have a bad temper.  That’s just who I am.”

 

But people with growth mindsets see themselves as forever malleable and capable of new growth. 

 

If you want to know what children in school will achieve the most in life, don’t look at IQ.  Look at mindset.  People with growth mindsets accomplish more because they don’t put false ceilings on themselves or see themselves cast in concrete.  They’re always looking for ways to learn and grow. 

 

And that’s the mindset McD wants to see on the Bills.    

Flawlessly said, thanks! Hondo ... this beer is for you! ... :beer:

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14 hours ago, Thurman#1 said:

 

 

Yup. She comes from a teaching background and came up with this stuff in experiments on kids. But it was a case of a universal phenomena showing up in one group, kids.

 

I use this on my kid all the time. Dweck advises you to never say stuff like, "You're so smart." Or "you're really good at that." Because then you're complimenting their talent and when they reach a situation where they fail they think, "Oh, I'm doomed, I'm not talented enough.

 

Whereas if you compliment them by saying, "Oh, you worked so hard," or, "Oh, you tried a new way there, didn't you? That's great, you're really trying to think in new ways. That's really good," then if they fail they think, "Well, if I keep working and trying new ways, I'll eventually get it.

 

I constantly remind myself to be doing this with my 5 year-old.

 

Dweck has a good TED talk where she tells about this far better than I can. And all in under 10 minutes.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for posting the Ted Talk.

 

As you mention, Dwek says to praise the effort not the result.  "Oh, you worked so hard" - that's what you want to promote.  In other words, it's all about the "PROCESS." 

 

10 hours ago, BuffaLoko said:

Flawlessly said, thanks! Hondo ... this beer is for you! ... :beer:

 

Thanks, brother.  Usually I just rephrase Yolo or cut-and-paste Wikipedia.  

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I use Dweck's work in the college classroom all the time. It's really the foundation of learning: being humble and self-aware and gritty enough to acknowledge room for improvement, and then to set about making those improvements. 

 

Unfortunately, there are so many circumstances/traits that can cause people to retreat behind more "fixed" mindsets, including poverty, trauma, immaturity, arrogance, etc.

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On 3/6/2021 at 8:22 AM, Thurman#1 said:

 

 

Yup. She comes from a teaching background and came up with this stuff in experiments on kids. But it was a case of a universal phenomena showing up in one group, kids.

 

I use this on my kid all the time. Dweck advises you to never say stuff like, "You're so smart." Or "you're really good at that." Because then you're complimenting their talent and when they reach a situation where they fail they think, "Oh, I'm doomed, I'm not talented enough.

 

Whereas if you compliment them by saying, "Oh, you worked so hard," or, "Oh, you tried a new way there, didn't you? That's great, you're really trying to think in new ways. That's really good," then if they fail they think, "Well, if I keep working and trying new ways, I'll eventually get it.

 

I constantly remind myself to be doing this with my 5 year-old.

 

Dweck has a good TED talk where she tells about this far better than I can. And all in under 10 minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

meh, there's nothing new under the sun...

 

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