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Andy Reid’s son admits drinking before accident that severely injured child [edited title]


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2 minutes ago, SDS said:


There’s going to be a settlement. It doesn’t matter who is “legally” responsible, the NFL, the Chiefs and the Reid family are going to avoid the court of public opinion. Nobody wins in this public relations fiasco. Someone is going to get paid whether it’s public or not. Just cut the check.


Speaking as one who had a ringside seat to a settlement process involving a severely handicapped child, I hope you are correct.  That would be something approaching just, as far as it can be approached

 

Speaking as a sometime realist, I’m not so sure.   Those out of sight arguments about whose pocket the check comes from could get fierce.

 

 I’d be truly happy to accept my “peanuts” hat on this, though

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personal story on the topic. When me and my ex wife were going to the store one night we were rear ended by a drunk driver with no insurance. My then wife was 6 1/2 months pregnant. The accident cause

“Ignorance” has such a negative connotation that I hate to use the word here. It just means a lack of knowledge or awareness. I’m seeing a lot of that here.    Of course the victims get the

Prayers for the five year old and family.  Without commenting specifically on Reid, I’ll just share my opinion that driving after having even one adult beverage is astoundingly selfish.

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8 hours ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

 

No, it's not.  She and her family have a long, long road ahead of her.  I wish them courage, and I wish her the best possible outcome she can have.

 

In a right world, the Reid family would accept responsibility and see to it that she has every facility to assure her of that. 

 

In the world we live in, assistance would be taken as an admission of guilt. The matter will probably churn through the courts for the next 5-10 years.  Thankfully due to the generosity of the GoFundMe the family will have some resources, though with medical care and rehab that amount will go fast.

 

 

I don't think a civil suit will take that long.  Obv Reid's lawyer would be looking to settle, but there family would rather go to court on an indefensible case.  They will need to cover costs of lifetime care for their daughter at minimum.  Reid won't be the only one named because he can't doesn't have any real money. 

8 minutes ago, SDS said:


There’s going to be a settlement. It doesn’t matter who is “legally” responsible, the NFL, the Chiefs and the Reid family are going to avoid the court of public opinion. Nobody wins in this public relations fiasco. Someone is going to get paid whether it’s public or not. Just cut the check.

 

 

I doubt it.  Why should the family settle?  A jury will award far more than any settlement offer.  Reid has no mitigating factors to bargain off of.

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1 hour ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

 

How many truly wealthy people you acquainted with?  There are some truly good and generous wealthy folk, but some of them are also the worst skinflints you've ever met - the kind of people who would give cans of expired olives and relish brands they dislike to a food drive instead of money or making the effort to provide something helpful and nourishing.

 

1 hour ago, aristocrat said:

well that's what your post implies with all the talk of they would rather give spoiled food to the poor than open their wallets.  

 

One does not apply other - it is one thing to give away expired (past sell date items) and another to give spoiled items.

Items can spoil before sell date or after sell date.

 

 

 

I worked a charity event for the poor.  Lavish dinner with top shelf booze and it was tax deductible.  There was a significant amount of food leftover and some of the staff were eating it post cleanup. 

 

One of the organizers came in and said "I hope you are not charging time to the eating of the food" (they already violated labor laws not allowing breaks for workers) and the lead said "No we already recorded our time." 

 

The organizer noticed a stack of boxes and asked what they were and lead said they were leftovers and Joe was going to bring them to homeless shelter as part of food kitchen dinner.  Organizer said they did not want someone being paid with a conflict of interest giving away food after being paid to serve it - person giving it away might be inclined to not serve some items.  Joe who was part of the team doing collections recording came out of room where they were doing paperwork and said 'Unlike your sons who were being paid to work event who took several unopened boxes of steaks home when they left I was not paid but a volunteer so no conflict of interest."  He then took boxes for homeless shelter and left. 

 

The organizer responded "Who does he think he is?" and the lead's response was "Joe is a CPA who volunteered his time and knows that writing those boxes of steaks as write offs might make IRS look as this event as questionable charity donation."

 

Some wealthy are truly generous like Ralph Wilson was and donated most of his fortune and some look at charity events as part of their social calendars.

 

green_hornet.jpg

 

Oh and spelling should be Britt Reid with 2 t's - Same name as character of the Green Hornet, a very wealthy character who tried to do good.

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13 minutes ago, Mr. WEO said:

 

 

I don't think a civil suit will take that long.  Obv Reid's lawyer would be looking to settle, but there family would rather go to court on an indefensible case.  They will need to cover costs of lifetime care for their daughter at minimum.  Reid won't be the only one named because he can't doesn't have any real money. 

 

 

I doubt it.  Why should the family settle?  A jury will award far more than any settlement offer.  Reid has no mitigating factors to bargain off of.


They would settle for a substantial sum or else risk getting a fraction of the settlement by going after non-liable people. NFL lawyers vs theirs. 

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19 minutes ago, Mr. WEO said:

I don't think a civil suit will take that long.  Obv Reid's lawyer would be looking to settle, but there family would rather go to court on an indefensible case.  They will need to cover costs of lifetime care for their daughter at minimum.  Reid won't be the only one named because he can't doesn't have any real money. 

 

I doubt it.  Why should the family settle?  A jury will award far more than any settlement offer.  Reid has no mitigating factors to bargain off of.

 

Well....I think right there you kind of spelled out the reason.  The guy who is without question involved, probably lacks money.  There's plenty of money in the neighborhood - NFL, Chiefs, Reid - but going to court risks that one or more of those parties the family's lawyer tries to involve would get let off the hook.

 

So who knows?  Personally I hope that @SDS is correct and the NFL/Chiefs/Reid ante up quickly and generously to avoid a prolonged public display.  It would have the benefit for the family that they could get the child into the best rehab care and hire individual therapists and whatever else might give her the best chance to recover, purchase a house and make modifications to give her as much independence as possible, etc. 

 

When a lawsuit drags out for years and meanwhile it's hard to make good decisions about what to do because the amount of funding is at question, it doesn't serve the patient's interest (been there, seen that).  Why I was so relieved to see a substantial GoFundMe accumulate.

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10 minutes ago, SDS said:


They would settle for a substantial sum or else risk getting a fraction of the settlement by going after non-liable people. NFL lawyers vs theirs. 

 

10 minutes ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

 

Well....I think right there you kind of spelled out the reason.  The guy who is without question involved, probably lacks money.  There's plenty of money in the neighborhood - NFL, Chiefs, Reid - but going to court risks that one or more of those parties the family's lawyer tries to involve would get let off the hook.

 

So who knows?  Personally I hope that @SDS is correct and the NFL/Chiefs/Reid ante up quickly to avoid a prolonged public display.  It would have the benefit for the family that they could get the child into the best rehab care and hire individual therapists and whatever else might give her the best chance to recover.

 

There's no risk to the plaintiff if others sued are let out by the judge or found to not be liable by a jury.  If the Chiefs and/or the NFL feel they are not liable, they certainly won't be offering much in the way of a settlement.  If the Chiefs (I don't see where Andy Reid would have to offer a penny at this point) offer money, then they must know that there is something that would come out letting a jury find culpability.  If there is something to that, no way a plaintiff's lawyer is going to let a business worth a billion(s?) offer some token amount.  If NFL lawyers called up plaintiff's attorney offering some money, then it's open season...

 

But even a potential settlement isn't going to conclude in the next year--in time to take care of placing this poor kid in a brain rehab facility.  

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25 minutes ago, Mr. WEO said:

 

 

 

 

But even a potential settlement isn't going to conclude in the next year--in time to take care of placing this poor kid in a brain rehab facility.  

That’s the worst part of this thing.  That family must be struggling so hard emotionally, the financial burden piled on is just so cruel.

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  • 4 weeks later...

https://deadspin.com/why-the-hell-hasn-t-britt-reid-been-arrested-already-1846486173

"Why the hell hasn’t Britt Reid been arrested already?"

 

Quote

Six weeks later, Ariel Young is awake after spending two weeks in a coma, as a result of the injuries sustained in the crash. But according to her lawyer, Tom Porto, she remains unable to talk or walk, and has likely sustained brain damage that will affect her for the rest of her life. (Porto did not respond to requests for comment.)

 

Quote

Here’s where I inject myself into the conversation to talk about my experiences as a Public Defender. Had Britt Reid been my client (meaning, a regular person and not the son of a future Hall-of-Fame coach) in the suburbs outside Chicago, he would not only have been charged within the first 24 hours, he probably would have been handcuffed to his hospital bed while he recovered. I even reached out to my former colleague, Jeff York, now the Public Defender for DuPage County, to ask if I was assessing the case correctly. He assured me I was.

 

Quote

But if you ask DUI attorneys in Jackson County, Missouri (and I did), where the accident took place, they’ll tell you the lab results on Reid’s bloodwork aren’t back yet, and that it’s not unusual for the state lab to take six weeks or longer to return results.
 

Indeed, when Deadspin reached out to the Kansas City Police Department, we were told that the case file on Reid’s accident had been turned over to the Jackson County Prosecutor’s Office. When we contacted the Prosecutor’s Office, we were told they had not received the case file, and were unable to comment on the case at all. And though he refused to confirm whether or not the office was waiting on Reid’s blood test results, Director of Communications Michael Mansur did tell me that, in some cases, intoxicated drivers are charged right away, “such as if a person is so impaired that there’s no doubt.” When asked why that wasn’t the case with Britt Reid, who hit a parked car and admitted to drinking, Mansur responded, “I don’t know, I haven’t read the case file.” Mansur also told me it’s not unusual for it to take three to five months to bring charges in a case like Reid’s.

 

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?
 

Quote

I reached out to Travis Jones, a consultant and instructor in the field of DUIs, who is often called as an expert witness in DUI cases. A former police officer himself, Jones told me he thought the fact that Reid was still a free man came down to good old-fashioned politics. “You have a case where there is a direct threat to the public … and there was obviously impairment involved. The only reason they won’t issue (an arrest warrant) is for the simple fact that they’re afraid of some political comeback on them.”

 

 

 

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Hap, I just read the article and maybe you can clarify something.  I know you work in medicine and you probably know by now I’ve been in medical device, biotech sales and Mgmt., for twenty years.  When we were trying to get an LMN (letter of medical necessity for others) approved with needed documentation, if we needed another A1C done or for Medicare a C-Peptide, we could get the patient to go to the hospital and get a result in hours.  For those who don’t know, a C-Pep is a frozen test which measures insulin production out of the pancreas.  I think most people know an A1C is a simple blood test for diabetics.  One of the areas I used to work in was selling glucose sensors and insulin pumps. When you are trying to make a number, you do what it takes to get a perfect file together as the patient finally makes the decision to change and wants it now.

 

why does a simple blood test for alcohol or narcotics, prescription drugs takes weeks or months.  When most of you get a job, you have to take a drug test to clear, and background check.  The drug test results are back in less than 24 hours.  
 

My point is this is sketchy why he hasn’t been charged and going through the criminal justice process.  It screams of privilege and not cool.  For a guy who has a previous DUI, and this time injures someone and admits he was drinking, this should’ve been adjudicated by now.

 

I don’t care if someone has a beer at a sports bar, watching the Bills, but because I drive for work and I care about others, I will never have more than two beers over several hours.  First, because I never want to hurt someone, amd second, I don’t want to lose my career.

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3 minutes ago, machine gun kelly said:

Hap, I just read the article and maybe you can clarify something.  I know you work in medicine and you probably know by now I’ve been in medical device, biotech sales and Mgmt., for twenty years.  When we were trying to get an LMN (letter of medical necessity for others) approved with needed documentation, if we needed another A1C done or for Medicare a C-Peptide, we could get the patient to go to the hospital and get a result in hours.  For those who don’t know, a C-Pep is a frozen test which measures insulin production out of the pancreas.  I think most people know an A1C is a simple blood test for diabetics.  One of the areas I used to work in was selling glucose sensors and insulin pumps. When you are trying to make a number, you do what it takes to get a perfect file together as the patient finally makes the decision to change and wants it now.

 

why does a simple blood test for alcohol or narcotics, prescription drugs takes weeks or months.  When most of you get a job, you have to take a drug test to clear, and background check.  The drug test results are back in less than 24 hours.  
 

My point is this is sketchy why he hasn’t been charged and going through the criminal justice process.  It screams of privilege and not cool.  For a guy who has a previous DUI, and this time injures someone and admits he was drinking, this should’ve been adjudicated by now.

 

I don’t care if someone has a beer at a sports bar, watching the Bills, but because I drive for work and I care about others, I will never have more than two beers over several hours.  First, because I never want to hurt someone, amd second, I don’t want to lose my career.

 

I can't answer this. 

When I worked in the ER at a major hospital (this was decades ago) we would get toxic screen results on patients with an altered state of consciousness back in half an hour, max - blood alcohol plus half a dozen other recreational drugs common at the time - so we had the information needed to treat the patient.

 

When this was discussed with regard to Ed Oliver last off season, one of our guys who works in law enforcement (I think it might have been @LeviF91) said it took their lab > 1 month to get blood test results back.  I don't know if they have to use a special lab that uses special equipment or some special chain of custody that makes everything take longer or what the case is.

 

As Britt Reid went to the hospital after the accident and required surgery, I guarantee with the case history he came in with the hospital lab drew blood and ran a toxic screen (or whatever they call it there)

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, machine gun kelly said:

Exactly.  I have compassion with people who suffer from addictions, but not so far as when they hurt others.

 

Thanks for you’re input.

 

And THAT is where the fuzzy part kicks in.  

 

I know you get it, and it’s tricky as can be imagined! 

 

.

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I do Augie.  When people are not responsible and know to say no after 1-2 for several hours and certainly not mixing with prescription meds, that’s a problem and if you hurt yourself or others, that’s where I have little compassion.  As a small example I can tell you how many times I’ve gone up the street to watch the Bills game at 4 pm at Wild Wings.  It’s two blocks away.  I’ll maybe get 5 wings, and have two beers over 3+ Hours.  I’ll watch other knock back a six pack or more and watch them get in the car.  It just reminds me it’s not just after dark, there are a lot of people putting themselves and others in danger.  It’s irresponsible.

 

You know, nuff said from me.

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7 hours ago, machine gun kelly said:

Hap, I just read the article and maybe you can clarify something.  I know you work in medicine and you probably know by now I’ve been in medical device, biotech sales and Mgmt., for twenty years.  When we were trying to get an LMN (letter of medical necessity for others) approved with needed documentation, if we needed another A1C done or for Medicare a C-Peptide, we could get the patient to go to the hospital and get a result in hours.  For those who don’t know, a C-Pep is a frozen test which measures insulin production out of the pancreas.  I think most people know an A1C is a simple blood test for diabetics.  One of the areas I used to work in was selling glucose sensors and insulin pumps. When you are trying to make a number, you do what it takes to get a perfect file together as the patient finally makes the decision to change and wants it now.

 

why does a simple blood test for alcohol or narcotics, prescription drugs takes weeks or months.  When most of you get a job, you have to take a drug test to clear, and background check.  The drug test results are back in less than 24 hours.  
 

My point is this is sketchy why he hasn’t been charged and going through the criminal justice process.  It screams of privilege and not cool.  For a guy who has a previous DUI, and this time injures someone and admits he was drinking, this should’ve been adjudicated by now.

 

I don’t care if someone has a beer at a sports bar, watching the Bills, but because I drive for work and I care about others, I will never have more than two beers over several hours.  First, because I never want to hurt someone, amd second, I don’t want to lose my career.

 

7 hours ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

 

I can't answer this. 

When I worked in the ER at a major hospital (this was decades ago) we would get toxic screen results on patients with an altered state of consciousness back in half an hour, max - blood alcohol plus half a dozen other recreational drugs common at the time - so we had the information needed to treat the patient.

 

When this was discussed with regard to Ed Oliver last off season, one of our guys who works in law enforcement (I think it might have been @LeviF91) said it took their lab > 1 month to get blood test results back.  I don't know if they have to use a special lab that uses special equipment or some special chain of custody that makes everything take longer or what the case is.

 

As Britt Reid went to the hospital after the accident and required surgery, I guarantee with the case history he came in with the hospital lab drew blood and ran a toxic screen (or whatever they call it there)

 

 

 


 

There is a huge difference in testing in ED for altered state and doing legal work for court cases.

 

In the emergency rooms - the sample goes down the lab and is run and processed right on site.  Most labs have automated instruments that run and detect major categories of abused drugs and alcohol.  They test them and send the results back up to the doctor for treatment within an hour.  Those samples are tested one time and usually not confirmed.  There are very specific regulatory rules about the reporting and comments to state they are not confirmed and they are screening only for treatment.

 

For cases that involve police, legal matters, and injury; these samples are collected in very special ways via an entire chain of custody.  The samples must be collected and sealed and protected to ensure no one has access to the unopened container.  The samples along with a bunch of paperwork is then sent to a very limited number of laboratories around the country.  The numbers are constantly dwindling because it is so expensive to run a toxicology laboratory that deals in forensic matters.  The amount of regulation is insane and you are inspected at minimally 2x per year to ensure compliance.  At one time the lab I ran was a forensic Toxicology lab and at that point we were one of 3 in NYS and l about 75 across the country.  Those numbers are significantly fewer now.

 

The sample will arrive in a lab and be matched to the chain of custody number and a lab number and everyone that touches the sample was sign on a form for each step of the process. The initial screen is usually pretty quick - similar to the hospital screens - depending upon the order, but all positive results must be confirmed by an alternate highly specific and highly sensitive method.  That is where delays take place.  The confirmation testing is typically done in large batches to ensure profitability for the lab.  A confirmation test for alcohol or other drugs might get performed once a week and depending upon where the sample hits it might go into a second week.  If there are other drugs whether illegal or prescription that cause positive screening tests those also must get confirmed. So you end up having all of the testing done typically in 2 to 3 weeks.  The results then need to be reviewed by the medical director/toxicologist to ensure everything makes sense and then everything is signed off and finalized.

 

Then comes the final step where the lab has to match the lab case number back to the original chain of custody and send the results back to the client.  The lab is testing samples based solely on a number and have (or should have) no idea whose sample belongs to who.  Once the samples get back to the client - they may ask for additional confirmation testing or clarification or repeats to ensure what they need.  They also typically ask the lab to put together what is called a litigation package - which takes several days to a week - where everyone involved signs off on affidavits that they did not do anything to the sample, all testing results and quality control results are paired up to ensure the quality of the results, all confirmatory results and batches are put together within the data to validate the results, and all medical directors notes on the sample are filed.  These are then all revised by a lawyer and then provided back to the client.  The lab then also prepares themselves to be involved in the case if needed to validate the lawsuit.

 

Not every forensic case is that in depth as many times the lab once it provides the results to the client is done, but in a high profile case that will involve multiple lawsuits - they are going to have to produce an entire litigation package and that will cause the results to be weeks - as the lab maybe working on 5-10 of these at one time.

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8 hours ago, machine gun kelly said:

 

8 hours ago, machine gun kelly said:

 

why does a simple blood test for alcohol or narcotics, prescription drugs takes weeks or months.  When most of you get a job, you have to take a drug test to clear, and background check.  The drug test results are back in less than 24 hours.  
 

 


i suspect the delay is due to covid. Many crime labs are backed up around the country and these tests are probably just waiting in a long line to process. 

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4 hours ago, Rochesterfan said:

 


 

There is a huge difference in testing in ED for altered state and doing legal work for court cases.

 

In the emergency rooms - the sample goes down the lab and is run and processed right on site.  Most labs have automated instruments that run and detect major categories of abused drugs and alcohol.  They test them and send the results back up to the doctor for treatment within an hour.  Those samples are tested one time and usually not confirmed.  There are very specific regulatory rules about the reporting and comments to state they are not confirmed and they are screening only for treatment.

 

For cases that involve police, legal matters, and injury; these samples are collected in very special ways via an entire chain of custody.  The samples must be collected and sealed and protected to ensure no one has access to the unopened container.  The samples along with a bunch of paperwork is then sent to a very limited number of laboratories around the country.  The numbers are constantly dwindling because it is so expensive to run a toxicology laboratory that deals in forensic matters.  The amount of regulation is insane and you are inspected at minimally 2x per year to ensure compliance.  At one time the lab I ran was a forensic Toxicology lab and at that point we were one of 3 in NYS and l about 75 across the country.  Those numbers are significantly fewer now.

 

The sample will arrive in a lab and be matched to the chain of custody number and a lab number and everyone that touches the sample was sign on a form for each step of the process. The initial screen is usually pretty quick - similar to the hospital screens - depending upon the order, but all positive results must be confirmed by an alternate highly specific and highly sensitive method.  That is where delays take place.  The confirmation testing is typically done in large batches to ensure profitability for the lab.  A confirmation test for alcohol or other drugs might get performed once a week and depending upon where the sample hits it might go into a second week.  If there are other drugs whether illegal or prescription that cause positive screening tests those also must get confirmed. So you end up having all of the testing done typically in 2 to 3 weeks.  The results then need to be reviewed by the medical director/toxicologist to ensure everything makes sense and then everything is signed off and finalized.

 

Then comes the final step where the lab has to match the lab case number back to the original chain of custody and send the results back to the client.  The lab is testing samples based solely on a number and have (or should have) no idea whose sample belongs to who.  Once the samples get back to the client - they may ask for additional confirmation testing or clarification or repeats to ensure what they need.  They also typically ask the lab to put together what is called a litigation package - which takes several days to a week - where everyone involved signs off on affidavits that they did not do anything to the sample, all testing results and quality control results are paired up to ensure the quality of the results, all confirmatory results and batches are put together within the data to validate the results, and all medical directors notes on the sample are filed.  These are then all revised by a lawyer and then provided back to the client.  The lab then also prepares themselves to be involved in the case if needed to validate the lawsuit.

 

Not every forensic case is that in depth as many times the lab once it provides the results to the client is done, but in a high profile case that will involve multiple lawsuits - they are going to have to produce an entire litigation package and that will cause the results to be weeks - as the lab maybe working on 5-10 of these at one time.

 

Thanks for the explanation, @Rochesterfan

 

Ordinary hospital labs face a heavy burden of regulations and are inspected frequently as well, but I grasp that the requirements around chain of custody, "blinding" of the tests, and confirmation, are different.

 

What's weird to me about all this, however, is that we had a very publicized case around here where a young mother was tried and convicted of 1st degree murder for having murdered her infant by putting antifreeze in his formula.  The tests were apparently all based upon a single hospital's test results without a confirmatory test, not specialized forensic laboratory results.  Her conviction was overturned when a second child, born while she was in jail awaiting trial and removed to foster care, became ill and was diagnosed as having a genetic disease, MMA.  Tests proved her dead child also had that disease and had died of untreated MMA. (the original test was apparently unable to resolve propionic acid, a metabolite produced with MMA disease, from ethylene glycol)

 

So evidently one needs a special forensic toxicology lab and special confirmatory tests, until one doesn't?

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14 minutes ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

 

Thanks for the explanation, @Rochesterfan

 

Ordinary hospital labs face a heavy burden of regulations and are inspected frequently as well, but I grasp that the requirements around chain of custody, "blinding" of the tests, and confirmation, are different.

 

What's weird to me about all this, however, is that we had a very publicized case around here where a young mother was tried and convicted of 1st degree murder for having murdered her infant by putting antifreeze in his formula.  The tests were apparently all based upon a single hospital's test results without a confirmatory test, not specialized forensic laboratory results.  Her conviction was overturned when a second child, born while she was in jail awaiting trial and removed to foster care, became ill and was diagnosed as having a genetic disease, MMA.  Tests proved her dead child also had that disease and had died of untreated MMA. (the original test was apparently unable to resolve propionic acid, a metabolite produced with MMA disease, from ethylene glycol)

 

So evidently one needs a special forensic toxicology lab and special confirmatory tests, until one doesn't?


 

Yes all labs are inspected - sometimes quite frequently.  My current hospital based lab has had 3 inspections already in 2021 (some because of Covid pushing inspections back), but they are not the same level as the SAMSHA inspections (along with the regular inspection the lab has.

 

The interesting thing is drug testing is highly specialized and for these cases require specific testing protocols. 
 

Testing for Antifreeze is general done in a hospital based setting due to suicide attempts and there is little to no regulations set up for that testing in legal cases.  I have been involved in multiple legal cases involving Antifreeze and Methanol poisoning, but typical the hospital results do not hold up in court because they are not under chain of custody and the samples are not stored under lock and key.

 

Typically in these cases the lab results become part of the picture, but they need to prove the attempt beyond the results.  Many times in cases like that an autopsy report and testing is admissible and becomes the supporting documentation with the lab results just adding to the info.

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The young crash victim is still in the hospital, and her family is getting salty about no charges for Britt:

 

https://www.foxnews.com/sports/britt-reid-crash-victim-not-to-be-forgotten-ex-coach-living-his-normal-life

 

Quote

"Ariel remains in the hospital, she is getting a little better each day but she still has a long road to recovery. Britt Reid is out everyday living his normal life while she cannot, please don’t let her story be forgotten. Court will take a long time and we don’t know what will be the outcome of it all. So please keep sharing her story and praying for her and the family. Thank you," the update from Saturday read.

 

I defer to the wisdom of those involved in the field, but it seems incredible to me that they don't have toxicology results yet on Reid.  It's closing on 60 days.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Hapless Bills Fan said:

The young crash victim is still in the hospital, and her family is getting salty about no charges for Britt:

 

https://www.foxnews.com/sports/britt-reid-crash-victim-not-to-be-forgotten-ex-coach-living-his-normal-life

 

 

I defer to the wisdom of those involved in the field, but it seems incredible to me that they don't have toxicology results yet on Reid.  It's closing on 60 days.

 

 


 

Hap - totally agree - 30 days really seems about the limit after that there is something more going on.

 

Even an additional 30 days seems more than the police should need to put a case together based upon the findings.

 

They also seem to be a state more open - so I would assume they are having grand jury meetings and other types of cases - so that should not be slowing it down.

 

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22 minutes ago, Rochesterfan said:

Hap - totally agree - 30 days really seems about the limit after that there is something more going on.

Even an additional 30 days seems more than the police should need to put a case together based upon the findings.

They also seem to be a state more open - so I would assume they are having grand jury meetings and other types of cases - so that should not be slowing it down.

 

They were saying from the start 30-60 days, but it's now 60 days so...

 

The State of MO has no restrictions, but individual counties and cities do.  KC and St Louis have mask mandates etc.

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