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1 hour ago, Miyagi-Do Karate said:


I am/was a big Tropper fan, but don’t think he has written anything in a long time.  Same with Nick Hornby, who I would compare Tropper too. 

Last I saw he was writing for TV and Movies only.   Had a deal with Cinemax.  Agree on the Hornby comparison, although I think Hornby's character development was a bit better, even if I didnt like the overall work more.   As much as I love Tropper, I think he was a bit of a one trick pony and the books got less exciting because you could kind of see where they were going having read his other titles.

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I realized there were no book threads. Don't we have readers here? Where are we? What are we reading? I always look for new suggestions. The truth is, I am an English teacher and teach upper-level Eng

I really need a print version of a book to read.  I have a tablet but would never be able to tolerate reading on one.  I think the only thing I would ever consider is the Kindle Paper-White because it

What's a book?

6 minutes ago, thenorthremembers said:

Last I saw he was writing for TV and Movies only.   Had a deal with Cinemax.  Agree on the Hornby comparison, although I think Hornby's character development was a bit better, even if I didnt like the overall work more.   As much as I love Tropper, I think he was a bit of a one trick pony and the books got less exciting because you could kind of see where they were going having read his other titles.


Regarding Tropper being a 1-trick pony, totally agree. All his books blend together in my mind. A few times I would read one of his books and about 50 Pages in, I wasn’t sure if I had read that one before. They all

mostly concern some middle-aged dude going through a crisis and sitting Shiva after someone died.

 

this reminds me of a similar author— Richard Russo. I really liked his books, but they all concern similar characters in similar locations doing mostly similar things. 

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My reading habits are all over the place. For example:

 

Sci-fi: Asimov, Bradbury, Clarke, and other classics, plus modern sci-fi. And of course, all five books in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy "trilogy." (If you like The Guide, you might also enjoy Adams' Dirk Gently novels.)

 

I don't read a lot of westerns, but I enjoyed the Lonesome Dove series.

 

Off-beat stuff: Kurt Vonnegut, Tom Robbins, Tony Vigorito.

 

I also read murder mysteries, courtroom dramas, and psychological thrillers, and flat-out comedies.

 

In non-fiction, I'm a science geek who also indulges in Eastern philosophy (mainly Taoism and Buddhism, not as religions but as a way of life.)

 

Others mentioned Dharma Bums (Kerouac) and Catch-22 (Heller). I liked both of those, although Catch-22 took a while to grab me. If you're reading it and thinking about giving up, give it a few more chapters - it'll be worth it.

 

 

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3 hours ago, transplantbillsfan said:

 

I'll have to read it.  I loved The Longest Day.  Have you read that?  Any similarities in style?

Never read 'The Longest Day', but I will, and soon.

 

Have held that book in my hand and put it back too often.

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I like an obscure sci-fi writer named R.A. Lafferty. Arrive at Easterwine is one of my personal favorites, but his work of historical fiction about Native Americans in Oklahoma, Okla Hanali, is arguably his best book and very good.

 

Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parsifal is the greatest medieval epic, by turns humorous, amorous, and mystical. I recommend the Cyril Edwards translation.

 

Ted Hughes' selected translation of the Metamorphoses, Tales From Ovid, is well done if you are interested in mythology in late antiquity. 

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Oh I completely forgot to mention him, but I like Dan Brown books a lot, too.  Again, it's total "fluff" reading, but thought-provoking nonetheless and the writing is action-packed enough to keep you consistently turning the pages.

 

All the Robert Langdon books are good, but Davinci Code, Origin, and Inferno are the best among them... probably in that order.  His 2 books outside of the Robert Langdon series (Deception Point and Digital Fortress) are also good.

 

He writes good mystery books and the Langdon books (a few of which are now Tom Hanks movies) focus on a Professor of "Symbology," so you can kinda guess where they go.

 

I would call them fun Summer reads.

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45 minutes ago, transplantbillsfan said:

Oh I completely forgot to mention him, but I like Dan Brown books a lot, too.  Again, it's total "fluff" reading, but thought-provoking nonetheless and the writing is action-packed enough to keep you consistently turning the pages.

 

All the Robert Langdon books are good, but Davinci Code, Origin, and Inferno are the best among them... probably in that order.  His 2 books outside of the Robert Langdon series (Deception Point and Digital Fortress) are also good.

 

He writes good mystery books and the Langdon books (a few of which are now Tom Hanks movies) focus on a Professor of "Symbology," so you can kinda guess where they go.

 

I would call them fun Summer reads.

 

I read Davinci Code, Origins and Angels and Demons. Good, easy but fun reads. My kind of style. I enjoyed them all. 

 

I don’t know if it was the Christian Brothers at St Joe’s HS or the Jesuits at Xavier for college taking the required philosophy and theology classes, but it might explain my enjoyment of light easy reading. Some of that stuff in college I had to read word by word, then go back and read the paragraph again. 

 

 

.

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1 hour ago, Augie said:

 

I read Davinci Code, Origins and Angels and Demons. Good, easy but fun reads. My kind of style. I enjoyed them all. 

 

I don’t know if it was the Christian Brothers at St Joe’s HS or the Jesuits at Xavier for college taking the required philosophy and theology classes, but it might explain my enjoyment of light easy reading. Some of that stuff in college I had to read word by word, then go back and read the paragraph again. 

 

 

.

 

Don't worry I completely agree!

 

I spent college with Shakespeare and postmodernism... which I loved... along with plenty I trudged through like Jane Austen.

 

And then I continued my education into my profession with Moby Dick (I very strongly dislike that book for a LOT of unnecessary whaling stuff tangential to the plot) and Ayn Rand (strong feelings of her works.... but they aren't boring) and so, frankly... I am at the point where I want "easy" and "mindless," since my day job involves the opposite. 

 

That said, give me a challenge that really piques my interests and I'm stoked. That's why I loved Surfing With Sartre so much.

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So I was going to order some of the books that were recommended and my wife says just buy a Kindle and get the e-books so we don't have a bunch of books laying around. Which brings me to the question, do you folks still read hard copies or has everyone gone electronic?

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1 hour ago, RaoulDuke79 said:

So I was going to order some of the books that were recommended and my wife says just buy a Kindle and get the e-books so we don't have a bunch of books laying around. Which brings me to the question, do you folks still read hard copies or has everyone gone electronic?

 

I read both, but since we subscribed to Amazon Prime, I've been reading a lot of e-books. Every month they release free books for subscribers. Often, they're the first books in a series. If I like it, I'll purchase more from that author.

 

I know some people really prefer the feel of a hard copy, but I find the tablet easier to hold. Also, when we travel, it's nice to have several books in one tablet.

 

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I read almost exclusively non-fiction. The following book is one that I learned a great deal from, and I think it would be very hard not to gain from this book in some way:

Tom, *****, Mulattoes, Mammies, and Bucks (Donald Bogle)

 

    The author is a UPenn professor, who has probably watched every single movie in which there was a black actor. In this book, Bogle points out the demeaning, stereotyped roles they played. He also pointed out the ridiculous premises of certain movies, for example Rocky ll." 

    He tells us how Sidney Portier was virtually de-sexed, and describes how in "To Sir With Love," he was harassed, tormrnted, underpaid, and assaulted, yet he ripped up a job application so he could stay there and continue to help white students!

    The chapter on Mulattoes was fascinating. He correctly states that there were movies about "passing for white" as if this was a normal condition that many black people faced. The movie "Pinky" was mentined in the chapter. It starred Jean Crain. The premise was just as ridiculous (if not more) as Rocky ll.

    Times have clearly changed, but this book serves as an eye opener and a history lesson of sorts. It is now frequently used as a textbook which is good, but drove up the cost.

 

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Not a huge book guy but I do like reading a few Sports books a year.  Right now I am currently reading Three Ring Circus by Jeff Pearlman about the Kobe-Shaq Lakers dynasty years.  Probably not the reading material the OP was looking for but for any Sports fans looking for some good light reading it's a pretty good behind the scenes look at those Laker teams.  

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3 hours ago, RaoulDuke79 said:

So I was going to order some of the books that were recommended and my wife says just buy a Kindle and get the e-books so we don't have a bunch of books laying around. Which brings me to the question, do you folks still read hard copies or has everyone gone electronic?

 

I have an old school Kindle that I used to bring with me when I traveled more.  I like it a lot, but I still prefer hard copies.

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1 hour ago, Gugny said:

 

I have an old school Kindle that I used to bring with me when I traveled more.  I like it a lot, but I still prefer hard copies.

From a storage and convenience factor the Kindle makes much more sense. I just downloaded the Kindle app on my tablet and bought Cosmic Bandidos for $2.99, so I'm going to venture into the electronic realm for the first time. 

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8 hours ago, I am the egg man said:

Thought I saw someone cite Dicken's in this thread.

 

'Oliver Twist' is a legendary read. Read it twice.

 

Haven't read that, yet.

 

A Tale of Two Cities is one of my all time favorites.

7 hours ago, RaoulDuke79 said:

So I was going to order some of the books that were recommended and my wife says just buy a Kindle and get the e-books so we don't have a bunch of books laying around. Which brings me to the question, do you folks still read hard copies or has everyone gone electronic?

 

Mentioned this earlier in the thread, but I very much prefer hard copy books. In fact, I have NEVER read an E book. Seems harder on the eyes.

 

As a teacher, when I'm done with the books I just bring them to my classroom library for students to read.

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1 hour ago, RaoulDuke79 said:

From a storage and convenience factor the Kindle makes much more sense. I just downloaded the Kindle app on my tablet and bought Cosmic Bandidos for $2.99, so I'm going to venture into the electronic realm for the first time. 

 

Cosmic Bandidos is such an awesome book and a wild ride! Enjoy!

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On 2/18/2021 at 5:29 PM, poblano said:

Have you ever read latin american authors?

I'm mexican and not so good in english, 

that's why I don't read in english and most of my readings are of those authors, and classics, like  Dickens, Dostoyevsky, Balzac(😍) and recently i read east of eden  and grapes of wrath and want to read more of Steinbeck.

all this without being an avid reader.

 

 

 

 

 

I love Jorge Luis Borges. Has some great stuff. However, the number of Latin American authors translated and readily available in England are not that many. 

 

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A few years ago I came across Christopher Hitchens and his work as a book reviewer. Read some of the books he wrote essays about and then went looking for more good reads - I found the Guardian newspapers list of 1000 books to read before you die and have been working my way through it ever since (although the list includes trilogies and series, some up to 40/50 in number, so the total is closer to 1400 or so.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2009/jan/23/bestbooks-fiction

 

The list is a good way of finding new authors. Currently reading through Chester Himes (A Rage in Harlem), have read 4 of his books this year so far. Although there are some books on this list that I just wonder at their inclusion.

 

Some authors I like but have not seen listed here: 

George MacDonald Fraser - the Flashman series. All are good but the earlier books are brilliant. Comedy gold.

Nevil Shute - 'A Town Like Alice' and 'On the Beach'. All his books are great - On The Beach should be a must read for any politician who may have their finger on the big button at some point.

Elmore Leonard. All his books ooze cool characters. So much of his stuff has been turned into movies or TV shows. Crime and some Westerns. Sometimes both (Justified came out of a bunch of his short stories about Raylan Givens).

Hilary Mantel. Salman Rushdie. Both produce books that are long reads and get a while to get used to. But love Wolf Hall and Midnight's Children.

Cormac McCarthy - Notably 'The Road' and 'All the Pretty Horses'. Again he is stylistically very different. Writes bleak, bleak novels. 

Ed McBain - 87th Precinct series. Light crime novels. One of the first police procedurals. As he wrote so many of these it will take a long time to read them all.

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