Jump to content
Reed83HOF

Cover 1 this week - sees more Run & Shoot & K-gun in our offense

Recommended Posts

Fairburn's Article from March 2019

 

https://theathletic.com/838469/2019/03/06/it-was-a-perfect-storm-how-jim-kellys-usfl-seasons-changed-the-course-of-the-bills-and-pro-football/

 

While some of that was cutting edge, the route adjustments are what separated the offense. Receivers and the quarterback would each read the coverage on the fly after the snap. On a given play, each receiver had a different route assignment depending on the coverage they saw. The quarterback and receiver not only had to read the coverage correctly, but they also both needed to be seeing the same thing. When they did, there wasn’t much the defense could do to stop it.

 

 

“To me, quarterbacks number one have to be a great leader,” Argovitz said. “Players have to respect you. Jim was a guy where, if players weren’t doing the right thing, he would get in their faces and he would tell them. He was not one to be quiet. He was very vocal. He led by example and led by getting in your face and telling you what you have to do.”

“He was the right kind of kid for a quarterback,” Davis said. “He’s a natural team leader. Whatever that is, he was. All of the team was 100 percent with him. He was a tough *****.”

 

Added Jones: “Jim was an incredible leader and one of the tough guys that I’ve ever been around. Because of his toughness, everybody on the team saw how he was a leader by example, doing his job when other things failed. When we didn’t block it how we were supposed to block it, he still hung in there and took a lick. That more than anything told me about Jim Kelly.”

 

“You have Jim with the big arm and he would throw it on time. He was pretty mobile and tougher than nails. He could sit in there. 

 

During his rookie season, his footwork was still a bit choppy as he made the transition and there were the growing pains that come with learning a new offense. When Jenkins took over as offensive coordinator, he had a plan.

First, he wanted to upgrade the offensive line. Not only did he want to make additions from the outside, but he wanted those already on the roster to develop. Kelly could not take the same beating he took as a rookie.

 

“That first year being hit so many times, being sacked so many times,” Jenkins said. “It could have ruined him. I’ve seen a lot of quarterbacks ruined in my day. They take a lot of hits and then they’re not reading the keys down the field. They’re not looking at defensive backs like they should. They’re looking at pass rushers. They’re never the same. They get turned upside down. That’s the separation that Jim Kelly had to so many of these guys today. That’s his mental toughness, his physical toughness.”

 

Erik's athletic article:

https://theathletic.com/1421086/?source=twittered

 

Researching the passing concept led me to the Run and Shoot (R&S) offense Beasley learned under coach June Jones at SMU.

Jones’ early coaching stops included the Houston Gamblers in 1984, with a roster that had quarterback Jim Kelly, and the Houston Oilers from 1987-88. Jones coached quarterback Warren Moon in that team’s version of the Run and Shoot offense.

 

The passing concept Beasley brought to Daboll is known as the “Go” concept. Jones said this was the first concept and he Darrel “Mouse” Davis, who helped create and institutionalize the Run and Shoot offense, would implement on the first day of practice. Teaching the concept and getting reps in early was important, Jones said, because the quarterback and receivers have to be on the same page for it to work at a high level. Once mastered, it’s a difficult play to stop because it has answers for every sort of coverage possible.

 

There was a lot of talk this offseason about how Allen watched film with Jim Kelly and the Bills were planning on running some of the same R&S concepts this season. Kelly got his crash course in this style of offense when he signed with the Gamblers and played under offensive coordinator and R&S architect “Mouse” Davis. Once Kelly made it to Buffalo, the offense was termed “K-Gun.” Rather than using four wide receivers like in the traditional R&S, the Bills installed the system with a tight end, specifically Keith McKellar. Kelly’s receivers, nicknamed the “Mouseketeers,” were small and shifty and fit seamlessly into Davis’ system.

 

It’s an offense that contains a lot of “option” concepts, for which the quarterback and receivers have to be on the same page. “It’s just building that chemistry out there and having my body language right so he can read it,” Beasley said of his and Allen’s budding dynamic during the preseason.

 

“I was happy to see that the Bills stuck with it,” Jones said, “because it’s a difficult concept to execute because of the rapport needed between the quarterback and receivers.”

 

  • Like (+1) 4
  • Awesome! (+1) 5
  • Thanks! (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Coach Tuesday said:

Cover 1 dug deep this week - really cool how he showed Beazers' college tape as a comparison.

 

 A couple weeks ago, if you watched this:

JK was saying we need to patient with this offense as it comes together and it will take some time for the QBs and WRs to get on the same page. We are using elements of the No-huddle with Josh and some of the basic concepts Jim and co. used back in the day. You start to get that vibe from the team too - everyone doubts us, but us, they do everything together, kids parties etc. Feels like everything is coming full circle. 

 

  • Like (+1) 6
  • Awesome! (+1) 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Reed83HOF said:
 

“You have Jim with the big arm and he would throw it on time. He was pretty mobile and tougher than nails. He could sit in there. 

 

 

 

:lol:  Literally, the first time I've ever seen Kelly called "pretty mobile."  

 

I still remember someone asking who was faster, Reich or Kelly, and getting the answer "You could time them with a sundial."

  • Haha (+1) 5
  • Thanks! (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOVE THIS STUFF, ReeD83HoF!!!!  This team is going to be friggin' fun to watch the next few years and probably more.  As deadly accurate as Josh was on Thursday, if they get some of this Run and Shoot stuff going well, they're gonna be practically unstoppable!

 

See this is why we've stuck it out for so, so many years of ineptitude and failure with this team.  The universe knows what Bills fans have been going through all these years without wavering one bit in our loyalty.  We've all believed the better days will come. I don't know about anyone else but this just doesn't feel like the "same old Bills" anymore. 

  • Like (+1) 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DC Tom said:

 

:lol:  Literally, the first time I've ever seen Kelly called "pretty mobile."  

 

I still remember someone asking who was faster, Reich or Kelly, and getting the answer "You could time them with a sundial."

:lol: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DC Tom said:

 

:lol:  Literally, the first time I've ever seen Kelly called "pretty mobile."  

 

I still remember someone asking who was faster, Reich or Kelly, and getting the answer "You could time them with a sundial."

 

I kind of remember a reporter asking (after a Kelly injury where he came back with a knee brace), "Do you think you can beat Kelly in a foot race with him having his knee brace?" and Levy replying something like, "What do you mean with his knee brace? I could always beat him in a race." 

 

That being said, I know I thought of him as pretty mobile. Never fast, but perhaps due to his strength, size, and toughness was able to make plays running when needed, especially early in his NFL career.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll just put this here rather than create another thread.  It's somewhat relevant to this:

https://theathletic.com/1426248/2019/12/02/this-week-in-bills-the-numbers-behind-the-no-huddle-transformation-and-an-updated-playoff-picture/

This week in Bills: The numbers behind the no-huddle transformation and an updated playoff picture

 

If you think the Bills’ offense has been different since the Miami game, you would be right. The Bills averaged 19.3 points per game in Week 1 through 10. In the last three weeks, Buffalo is averaging 27.3 points per game, all wins.

 

Here are some more numbers: In the Bills’ first nine games, Josh Allen attempted 31 passes out of the no-huddle and didn’t throw a single touchdown. In the last three weeks, Allen has attempted a league-high 38 passing attempts out of the no-huddle, to go with a league-high 265 passing yards and three touchdowns as well as 89 rushing yards and a touchdown. The no-huddle has pulled the offense out of a rut.

 

Daboll emphasizes that matchups are the deciding factor when determining a game plan. The Broncos came into their game against the Bills allowing 9.21 yards per play against the no-huddle, second-highest in the NFL. The Cowboys entered their game against the Bills allowing 6.63 yards per play in those situations, seventh-most in the league. Daboll took advantage of both matchups. The Ravens, the Bills’ next opponent, allow 6.28 yards per play against the no-huddle offense. That’s ninth-worst in the league.

 

...

 

the Bills have snapped the ball with an average of 10.8 seconds on the play clock while running no-huddle this season, making them the second slowest no-huddle offense in the NFL.

  • Like (+1) 2
  • Thanks! (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great read, love this stuff!

 

 It looked like Josh was changing the play call at the line quite often against Dallas and the result was usually good. The last few games it also looked like Brian Daboll has stuck with the run game even when the team got behind in points. 

 

Thinking back on those late 80's, early 90s' offenses it reminded me what helped make that offense work so well was the run game as Thurman Thomas was about 70% of the offense in running, receiving. Thurman's ability to read and hit the cutback hole was unreal and it makes me wonder if it would be a good idea to incorporate Ole Teds version of the Redskins "counter trey" run scheme in which the O line takes one step one way and reverts the other way. This makes the defense hesitate briefly and once they commit Thurman is hitting that hole and is gaining big yards. 

 

Most of those glory years Thurman was also the teams second leading receiver behind Andre Reed with more receptions then James Lofton, Don Beebe.

 

Everyone made a big deal about the K-gun offense and yet those teams usually ran the ball more then they threw it. 1988, 454 passing attempts vs 528 rushing attempts. 1989, 478 vs 532. 1990 with the #1 scoring offense in the NFL 425 vs 479. 

 

In 1991, 516 passing vs 505 rushing with the the Bills offense #4 in passing yards and #1 in rushing yards. Thurman Thomas 1407 yards rushing, 631 yards receiving gave him over 2000 yards of offense that season. 

 

1992, 509 attempts passing, 549 attempts rushing. Thomas over 2000 yards again with 1487 yards rushing, 626 yards receiving. 1993, 497 attempts passing, 550 attempts rushing.

 

Backup RB Kenneth Davis was also a big part of that Bills offense as he would spell Thurman without a huge drop off much like Singletary, Gore. 

 

With Daboll up in the booth and the play calling looking so much better this years offense should see improvements in the passing stats going forward. 

  • Like (+1) 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Nihilarian said:

Great read, love this stuff!

 

 It looked like Josh was changing the play call at the line quite often against Dallas and the result was usually good. The last few games it also looked like Brian Daboll has stuck with the run game even when the team got behind in points. 

 

Thinking back on those late 80's, early 90s' offenses it reminded me what helped make that offense work so well was the run game as Thurman Thomas was about 70% of the offense in running, receiving. Thurman's ability to read and hit the cutback hole was unreal and it makes me wonder if it would be a good idea to incorporate Ole Teds version of the Redskins "counter trey" run scheme in which the O line takes one step one way and reverts the other way. This makes the defense hesitate briefly and once they commit Thurman is hitting that hole and is gaining big yards. 

 

Most of those glory years Thurman was also the teams second leading receiver behind Andre Reed with more receptions then James Lofton, Don Beebe.

 

Everyone made a big deal about the K-gun offense and yet those teams usually ran the ball more then they threw it. 1988, 454 passing attempts vs 528 rushing attempts. 1989, 478 vs 532. 1990 with the #1 scoring offense in the NFL 425 vs 479. 

 

In 1991, 516 passing vs 505 rushing with the the Bills offense #4 in passing yards and #1 in rushing yards. Thurman Thomas 1407 yards rushing, 631 yards receiving gave him over 2000 yards of offense that season. 

 

1992, 509 attempts passing, 549 attempts rushing. Thomas over 2000 yards again with 1487 yards rushing, 626 yards receiving. 1993, 497 attempts passing, 550 attempts rushing.

 

Backup RB Kenneth Davis was also a big part of that Bills offense as he would spell Thurman without a huge drop off much like Singletary, Gore. 

 

With Daboll up in the booth and the play calling looking so much better this years offense should see improvements in the passing stats going forward. 

Being able to run multiple plays out of the same formation (Run v Pass, Deep V short, PA, ISO, Sweeps, etc.) is crucial and helps keep the defense guessing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is great stuff. Being proactive instead of reactive on offense, will provide plenty of opportunity for our skill players to succeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2019 at 4:22 PM, Nihilarian said:

it would be a good idea to incorporate Ole Ted's version of the Redskins "counter trey" run scheme

 

Heck YEAH it would! I've thought that several times this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that every week Daboll introduces something new, which is also helping.

 

It's going to take the best offensive game all year to stay close to the Ravens.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...