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Bucs Rookie Kahzin Daniels blind in one eye to make start

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On 11/6/2019 at 8:58 PM, RaoulDuke79 said:

He may be better suited to be a referee.

 

he still has a functional eye, no test results yet for the eye in his behind (endorsed by most refs and umps)

 

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22 hours ago, BuffaloMatt said:

Wesley Walker - Wikipedia

Not the first. We will see how it goes. Pun intended. 

One of the articles cited in the Wiki page really provides a good explanation of how the body compensates for lack of binocular vision.

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/09/13/science/visual-cues-compensate-for-blindness-in-one-eye.html?pagewanted=all

 

I'm legally blind n my right eye as well and have been since birth. I really don't have a reference for depth perception, since I've never had it. It isn't like you see things in 2D. You can see an object is 10 feet away or 20 feet away.

When I played in high school, it was mostly OL and DL. The only real handicap I could say was, as a nose tackle, not always catching someone blocking from my right.

When I got moved to FB my senior year, my RB coach used to call me "boards" because he said my hands were like two boards. So they just wouldn't throw it to me during a game. How much of that was due to lack of depth perception, idk, it might be that I just sucked at catching things.  pfft..not sure what they expected, I was an interior lineman the whole time I played the game.

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3 hours ago, CookieG said:

One of the articles cited in the Wiki page really provides a good explanation of how the body compensates for lack of binocular vision.

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/09/13/science/visual-cues-compensate-for-blindness-in-one-eye.html?pagewanted=all

 

I'm legally blind n my right eye as well and have been since birth. I really don't have a reference for depth perception, since I've never had it. It isn't like you see things in 2D. You can see an object is 10 feet away or 20 feet away.

When I played in high school, it was mostly OL and DL. The only real handicap I could say was, as a nose tackle, not always catching someone blocking from my right.

When I got moved to FB my senior year, my RB coach used to call me "boards" because he said my hands were like two boards. So they just wouldn't throw it to me during a game. How much of that was due to lack of depth perception, idk, it might be that I just sucked at catching things.  pfft..not sure what they expected, I was an interior lineman the whole time I played the game.

I can see out of both eyes and can catch things thrown at me approximately 70% of the time

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5 hours ago, CookieG said:

One of the articles cited in the Wiki page really provides a good explanation of how the body compensates for lack of binocular vision.

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/09/13/science/visual-cues-compensate-for-blindness-in-one-eye.html?pagewanted=all

 

I'm legally blind n my right eye as well and have been since birth. I really don't have a reference for depth perception, since I've never had it. It isn't like you see things in 2D. You can see an object is 10 feet away or 20 feet away.

When I played in high school, it was mostly OL and DL. The only real handicap I could say was, as a nose tackle, not always catching someone blocking from my right.

When I got moved to FB my senior year, my RB coach used to call me "boards" because he said my hands were like two boards. So they just wouldn't throw it to me during a game. How much of that was due to lack of depth perception, idk, it might be that I just sucked at catching things.  pfft..not sure what they expected, I was an interior lineman the whole time I played the game.

That is kinda what I was trying to get at earlier. When your born with it, you don't know any different and learn to do everything with the disability. When it happens later on, it can be more difficult because you learned how to do things with the depth perception and ability to see from both eyes. Then you need to re train yourself Nd learn to do things again working with the disability and that can be more difficult and take more time to do.

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On 11/7/2019 at 2:10 PM, BillsFanNC said:

Being completely blind in one eye, it doesnt matter if you were born with it or if it came later in life...you have no depth perception.  If you throw me a football from 20 yards away I'll have no problem catching it, but if you soft toss one to me from a few feet away I'll have great difficulty judging it well enough to catch it.

how long have you been blind in that one eye?...how well can you see with your good eye (do you wear glasses)?...Ive been blind in my left eye since I was 12 and have no problem seeing the ball where it is (my agility to actually catch it might not be great though..lol)...though lately Ive been having problems reading up close, might be time to check and see if I need reading glasses :)

 

I do have to say that I'm a bit amazed at how many of us are blind in 1 eye...Ive only met 1 other person blind in 1 eye...I'm curious though how many of you are blind from Toxoplasmosis and Toxicara ?

Edited by Tsaikotic

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I was born with what they call lazy eye (Amblyopia) which is usually attempted to be corrected via wearing a patch.

It did not work for me for I was already reading when it was detected at 3 years old and trying to convince a 3 year old to not cheat to see is impossible.

I have been able to see 3D movies once at Jurassic Park Universal Studios and it freaked me out.

I do not have true depth perception but my brain developed a work around of changing focus of eye and doing the same thing the brain does fusing images together.

Unfortunately I am developing a cataract in my left (good) eye and will need surgery when cataract is large enough.

My eyes are always sensitive to light and I wear a hat indoors and out. 

When you do go outside use a wide brimmed hat and sunglasses with UV protection if you wish to reduce chances of developing cataracts.

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2 hours ago, Tsaikotic said:

how long have you been blind in that one eye?...how well can you see with your good eye (do you wear glasses)?...Ive been blind in my left eye since I was 12 and have no problem seeing the ball where it is (my agility to actually catch it might not be great though..lol)...though lately Ive been having problems reading up close, might be time to check and see if I need reading glasses :)

 

I do have to say that I'm a bit amazed at how many of us are blind in 1 eye...Ive only met 1 other person blind in 1 eye...I'm curious though how many of you are blind from Toxoplasmosis and Toxicara ?

 

I've been blind in my left eye for 13 years. I wear a contact lens in my good eye.  I can play catch with my son with zero problem at a normal distance, it's the close by (within a few feet) tosses that give me a problem because of the absence of depth perception. It's a 50/50 proposition at best if I'll catch the short toss. In the same way, if someone is going to hand me something small like change, I dont reach my hand out to meet theirs as I'll usually be slightly off target. Instead I just extend my hand and let them meet it where it is.

 

I lost my vision in a car accident. Shattered glass in the eye.

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