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elijah

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About elijah

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  1. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    Someone might, but it’s not going to be expected if they do and it’ll be a total surprise to even the general manager that selects them. Even the best receivers in this class only look to be low level number one at their highest potential. Someone might, but it’s not going to be expected if they do and it’ll be a total surprise to even the general manager that selects them. Even the best receivers in this class only look to be low level number one at their highest potential.
  2. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    No receiver in the first three rounds is a boiling hot take
  3. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    If we’re going receiver first round the most value would be to trade down to the mid 20’s and take the front offices preference of the remaining of Deebo, Harry and Harmon Other than that scenario, we should stay put and take a couple of these guys on day two and day three. Lots of depth in this class but no stars.
  4. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    From the tape I watched, I saw a lot of concentration drops from him. He looks down field before he has the ball often and it leads to drops. His hands are pretty subpar, nothing more than average at best. Also, the people noticing the work and saying thanks for it, I’ve been trying to give you ‘cheers’ or ‘thanks’ on your posts but I don’t think I’m able too with the new member groups, thank you anyways though!
  5. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    I think this is the next position I’m going to get into
  6. elijah

    Where in ROC are you?

    Also lastly I don’t know if maybe you could advance out of the prospects group despite not having the content count required. If you look at my activity, the majority of my content comes in threads that I’ve created, and I think I could humbly say they’ve been useful threads to start for the most part, with the majority of them getting 10+ thumbs up and thanks and things of that sort. It would really hurt my interest in the forum if i can’t start these types of threads anymore.
  7. elijah

    Where in ROC are you?

    @SDS sorry for posting this here, when you guys implemented the new member grouping system, I think you may have accidentally taken away the ‘prospects’ ability to view The Stadium, College Football and the forums of their liking entirely. I’m only allowed to view the ‘club’ forums. ^^ Apparently I’m also not allowed to edit my posts.
  8. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    I’ll be sure to check him out, i’ll add scouting reports here as the offseason goes
  9. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    Not that he couldn’t get mentioned in the top 15, I just haven’t seen his tape yet so I wasn’t going to make an uneducated report on him. We’ll revisit this in late April. Metcalf won’t hold up at the top through the whole process, he may not be as low as 12, but he won’t be a first rounder. He’s had serious injury issues along with poor hands and an extremely limited route tree.
  10. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    Hollywood Brown even looks small though, when he carries the ball it looks like an infant in his arms
  11. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    More than anything I think it’ll be stature and power, you’re looking for someone along the lines of 6’1 and 210 or bigger. They lack the dominant, go-get-it aggression in their receiving core.
  12. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    This is huge. This draft is loaded with quality number two and slot receivers, but there’s really no elite talent. I like three guys to potentially be a number one receiver, but all three of them have serious concerns holding them back. Kelvin Harmon has a terrific well-rounded game, but he lacks the athleticism necessary to be a number one. Deebo Samuel is far and away the most talented receiver in this draft, maybe the most talented in a long time, but he has way too long of an injury history to be trusted. Then lastly there’s N’Keal Harry, who has a very strong game overall, but he has no elite talent to put him above and beyond. There’s many many quality number two and slot receivers in this class, and we’re much better off trying to get a few in the middle rounds than a top receiver in the first.
  13. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    I wouldn’t say that it means we’re definitely not drafting a receiver in the first round, but i’d agree that it’s unlikely we select one in the first. In my opinion, there’s only two both worth a first and that the Bills would be willing to take in the first and that’s Kelvin harmon andy n’Keal Harry, I would support either of them getting selected. However, I do find it much more likely that we go with a receiver or two in the second and third rounds. As for the offensive line, I generally get through 100-150 draft prospects a year but i’m not as strong with the o-line as I am with the rest of the positions. That being said, I will make it through some offensive lineman.
  14. elijah

    Pre-Combine Receiver Rankings

    I’ll have to look into Tyre Brady. There’s a couple of names missing, I’ll be sure to add them through the weeks leading into the draft.
  15. Some notable names that may be missing from the list because I haven't had a chance to watch them yet; Bryan Edwards, Kendrick Rogers, Antoine Wesley. This is my personal work, and I figured I'd share it here. I'm not an expert by any means so take it for what it's worth. Sorry for the formatting, I couldn't figure out how to fix it after copy and pasting. My grades are on a scale: 9.5-10.0: Elite | 9.0-9.4: All-Pro | 8.5-8.9: Potential All-Pro | 7.5-8.4: Starter | 6.5-7.4: Potential Starter | 6.0-6.4: Depth Player | 0-5.9: Back-End Player 1.) Kelvin Harmon (NC State) - 8.0 2.) Deebo Samuel (South Carolina) - 7.9 3.) N’Keal Harry (Arizona State) - 7.9 4.) JJ Arcega-Whiteside (Stanford) - 7.7 5.) Emanuel Hall (Missouri) - 7.7 6.) DaMarkus Lodge (Ole Miss) - 7.7 7.) Hakeem Butler (Iowa State) - 7.5 8.) AJ Brown (Ole Miss) - 7.4 9.) David Sills (West Virginia) - 7.4 10.) Parris Campbell (Ohio State) - 7.3 11.) Anthony Johnson (Buffalo) - 7.3 12.) DK Metcalf (Ole Miss) - 7.2 13.) Riley Ridley (Georgia) - 7.2 14.) Marqise Brown (Oklahoma) - 7.2 15.) Collin Johnson (Texas) - 6.9 WR - Kelvin Harmon - NC State 6’2” - 215 Lbs. - Junior Pros: Attacks ball. Strong hands. Run blocking. Size. Strength. Diverse route tree. Ball tracking. Separation. High points ball. Persistence. Body adjustment. Catch radius. Cons: Choppy footwork. Explosiveness. Injuries: Review: (12/21/18) The talent in Kelvin Harmon is undeniable and the hype around him should start to accelerate as we get closer to the draft. There’s a clear deficiency in the athleticism in Harmon’s game as he lacks the top end speed and quickness of true number one receivers. However, outside of that Harmon is the dominant, physical athlete that you look for in your number one. His strong hands and grittiness make him a reliable target on every single play. Harmon shows a great ability to track and adjust to the ball which gives him nearly an unlimited catch radius. While some footwork is lacking, Harmon has one of the more complete route trees for a receiver at the college level. Overall, Harmon has a well developed game and should have a strong transition to the NFL level. Harmon is a late first round pick in terms of talent, but a sub 4.45 40 time could boost him into the top 10. Grade: 8.0 Tier: Starter Draft Stock: Day One Game Films: Syracuse (2018), Virginia (2018), Boston College (2018), WR - Deebo Samuel - South Carolina 6’0” - 210 Lbs. - RS Senior Pros: Return abilities. Power. Aggression. Tenacity. Attacks the ball. Hands. Separation. Versatility. Burst. Strong hands. Footwork. Agility. Cons: Injuries: Broken leg in 2017. Lingering hamstring issues throughout 2016 and 2015. Review: (9/5/18) There is no question surrounding the gifted talent that Deebo Samuel has. Samuel has the potential of an elite receiver with the athleticism he presents. He’s got the special aggression that you only see in receivers like Antonio Brown and Julio Jones. Samuel shows the type of ability to catch any ball that comes near him, the type of receiver who has an unlimited catch radius. He’s just an absolute force in the receiving game with an extremely athletic skill set. However, the issue with Samuel is his injuries. Through the last three seasons, Samuel has played just 18 games. In 2017, Samuel broke his leg causing him to miss the second half of the season. The true concern with Samuel’s injuries though, is his lingering hamstring issues. Hamstring injuries don’t typically disappear. The injuries are going to put general managers in a tough spot with Samuel. He’s got surefire number one receiver talent in the NFL, but these injuries are going to keep him off the field. (1/02) Samuel is the closest thing to a number one receiver that this draft class has to offer. Samuel is equipped with a stocky, stout body and the athleticism needed to dominate opposing secondaries in the NFL. Samuel has a mix of everything and is reminicsent of Sammy Watkins coming out of Clemson. If you can be forgiving of his past injuries, Samuel is worthy of a top 8 pick in the draft. Samuel has a well developed game coming out of school. His strong hands and aggressive nature are a welcoming sight at the receiving position. Samuels displays a good mix of agility, acceleration and footwork to be able to create separation at any level of the field. It’s hard to ignore his past hamstring issues and only see his talent though, and this will drop Samuel a bit in the draft, likely into the second round. Grade: 7.9 Tier: Starter Draft Stock: Day One - Day Two Game Films: Missouri (2018), Clemson (2018), NC State (2017), Kentucky (2017), Missouri (2016), WR - N’Keal Harry - Arizona State 6’3” - 215 Lbs. - Junior Pros: Power. Balance. Strength. Elusiveness. Run after catch. Versatility. Ball tracking. Body control. Hands. Suddenness. Cons: Injuries: Review: (1/03) N’Keal Harry plays a very physical and dominant brand of football, relying on his power and strength to make plays. He plays with the aggressive, go-get-it attitude that is required to be a number one receiver. Strong suddenness in his route running allows him to create quick separation from his defender. His size combined with his ball tracking, body control and strong hands make him a threat all over the field. Harry is a receiver that you could describe using the cliche as always open. The most dangerous part of Harry’s game comes after he already has the ball in his hands, his strength and balance make it extremely hard for a defensive back to being him to the ground. While Harry has a lot of strengths to his game and very little weaknesses, he lacks any true eye popping skills to suggest that he will be an elite receiver. Harry will be a quality starting receiver and can be the top receiver on his team, but it’s unlikely for him to join the likes of a Julio, AB or Deandre Hopkins type receiver. Grade: 7.9 Tier: Starter Draft Stock: Day One - Day Two Game Films: UTSA (2018), Oregon (2017), UCLA (2017), NC State (2017), WR - JJ Arcega-Whiteside - Stanford 6’2” - 225 Lbs. - RS Junior Pros: Strong hands. Attacks the ball. Smooth. Body adjustment. Release. Positioning. Separation. Cons: Athleticism. Injuries: Broken collarbone in high school. Review: (1/02) JJ Arcega-Whiteside is a very fundamentally clean and sound receiver. Whiteside’s lack of athleticism will hold him back from being a number one receiver in the NFL, but he has a rounded enough game to produce as a solid number two. Whiteside has a very similar game to Robert Woods. The body control and adjustment that Whiteside displays makes him a threat at every level of the field. His positioning is tremendous and allows him to practically eliminate the defensive back from most plays. Whiteside plays a very tactical style of football, he’s a receiver that would thrive in a Patriot style system. Despite his lack of athleticism and overall quickness, his attention to detail allows him to create separation from his defender. Grade: 7.7 Tier: Starter Draft Stock: Day Two Game Films: Oregon (2018), Washington State (2018), WR - Emanuel Hall - Missouri 6’2” - 195 Lbs. - Senior Pros: Vertical speed. Quickness. Separation. Agility. Run after catch. Catches with hands. Body control. Second gear. Cons: Passive hands. Limited route tree. Physicality. Limited production. Footwork. Injuries: Groin injury, 2018. Review: (1/06) Emanuel Hall possesses an innate athletic skill set. Hall may be one of the most athletic receivers in a draft class that’s lacking elite speed at the top of the boards. This speed and quickness allows Hall to often times run right past the opposing defensive backs. Raw and unpolished footwork can and should be improved, but this quick burst allows Hall to break out of his cuts with momentum and loads of speed. At any level of the field Hall excels at creating separation and putting a gap between he and his defender. While he pulls in passes with his hands and is rarely ever seen body catching, Hall is a little passive and rarely attacks the ball. He’ll mostly be able to create separation solely with his speed and athleticism, but bigger and stronger defensive backs at the next level may be able to get away with bullying Hall a little bit. Hall doesn’t play a very physical game and he will struggle against defensive backs that can match his speed. The rare athleticism that Hall presents, especially in this receiving class filled more with size than speed, will keep Hall near the top of the boards. Grade: 7.7 Tier: Starter Draft Stock: Day Two Game Films: Florida (2018), Wyoming (2018), Georgia (2017), Florida (2017), WR - DaMarkus Lodge - Ole Miss 6’1” - 205 Lbs. - Senior Pros: Quickness. Speed. Run after catch. Downfield blocking. Separation. Hands. Cons: Limited route tree. Physicality. Concentration drops. Injuries: Review: (1/02) DaMarkus Lodge is a strong vertical receiver with the speed and burst to create separation down the field. At times Lodge has exceptional hands and makes Odell Beckham like catches, but then he’ll drop must have balls. The Ole Miss style of offense is going to hurt Lodge’s draft stock as there isn’t much tape on Lodge running different routes. Lodge lacks physicality in his game but he makes up for it with a more finesse style of play. Grade: 7.7 Tier: Starter Draft Stock: Day Two Game Films: Vanderbilt (2018), Texas A&M (2018), WR - Hakeem Butler - Iowa State 6’5” - 220 Lbs. - RS Junior Pros: Size. Hand usage. Run blocking. Ball tracking. Catch radius. Fighter. Speed. Cons: Passive. Concentration drops. Acceleration. Route tree. Footwork. Injuries: Review: (1/02) There’s no looking past the potential that Hakeem Butler shows on the field. It starts with his 6’5” frame and enormous catch radius making him a viable option on any play. Butler goes at the ball with his hands and rarely ever relies on body catches. His size and ball tracking ability make him a threat on any route; he affords his quarterback a little bit of leeway with inaccurate balls. His effort level allows you to be a little forgiving with the holes in his game. Butler’s large frame comes with its downfalls, as it hurts his agility and acceleration. Subpar footwork and a small route tree hurt Butler’s chances to be a true number one at the NFL level. While Butler correctly uses his hands when going for the ball, he does so passively and this results in concentration drops and contested drops that need to be had. Overall, Butler’s weaknesses are things that can be overcame and his strengths are mostly unteachable which make him a very intriguing prospect. Grade: 7.5 Tier: Starter Draft Stock: Day Two Game Films: Washington State (2018), Kansas (2018), Kansas State (2018) WR - AJ Brown - Ole Miss 6’1”- 230 Lbs. - Junior Pros: Stout. Quickness. Footwork. Route running. Release. Power. Reliable. Cons: Downfield blocking. Press release. Vertical speed. Downfield separation. Injuries: Review: (1/02) AJ Brown has a very unique and specific skill set that will be most valuable out of the slot. Very methodical and strict footwork makes Brown a threat on quickly developed routes. He consistently finds himself open in the middle of the field 5-15 yards downfield. Quick and choppy feet make it easy for him to create separate on slant and in routes. He struggles against press and is easily jammed to the outside, this combined with a low end top speed eliminates his threat downfield. Brown’s stout and stocky body allows him to stand tall in the middle of the field and eat powerful hits. Grade: 7.4 Tier: Potential Starter Draft Stock: Day Two Game Films: Vanderbilt (2018), Alabama (2018), WR - David Sills - West Virginia 6’3” - 210 Lbs. - Senior Pros: Size. Downfield blocking. High point. Route running. Red zone threat. Patience. Footwork. Cons: Quickness. Concentration drops. Injuries: Review: (1/7) It’s hard to judge the value to David Sills game, he’s a very quietly talented receiver. At the surface, Sills doesn’t look like a very skillful receiver. He has very average speed, he isn’t too great with his quickness and his hands can be a touch underwhelming. However, the more you watch Sills game, the more talent you see. He has very deceiving footwork that allows him to create surprising separation. His footwork and route running ability combined with his size and length allows him to have a huge catch radius. Grade: 7.4 Tier: Potential Starter Draft Stock: Day Two Game Films: Iowa State (2018), Tennessee (2018), WR - Parris Campbell - Ohio State 6’0” - 210 Lbs. - RS Senior Pros: Speed. Run after catch. Agility. Zone awareness. Smooth breaks. Cons: Inconsistent hands. Limited route tree. Injuries: Knee injury. Ankle injury. Review: (1/06) Parris Campbell’s tape shows very little refined receiving experience. Campbell may be the NFL’s next best gadget tool given the right offensive coordinator. Given space and room, Campbell’s ability to create on his own makes him an extremely dangerous weapon. He’s strongest on shallow crossing routes, screen plays and anything that gets him the ball underneath with an open field to work with. Campbell has a great awareness of zone coverage, on his shallow routes he displays the knowledge to sit down and wait in the openings between zones. With the new wave of innovative offensive minds in the NFL, the right team will get great use out of Campbell and his abiilty to create in the open field. He has a very agile game and a remarkable knack to smoothly move through the field. However, in the wrong system, Campbell doesn’t have the overall talent to succeed. A very limited route tree along with inconsistent hands limits Campbell’s game to routes within five yards of the line of scrimmage or deep shots. Campbell doesn’t seem to have enough talent to just naturally be on the field in your starting lineup and rather he’ll require plays specifically designed for him. Grade: 7.3 Tier: Potential Starter Draft Stock: Day Two - Day Three Game Films: Michigan (2018), Indiana (2018), UNLV (2017), Maryland (2017), WR - Anthony Johnson - Buffalo 6’1” - 210 Lbs. - RS Senior Pros: Footwork. Route running. Hands. Balance. Power. Strong hands. Attacks the ball. Competitiveness. Ball tracking. Body control. Cons: Speed. Separation. Athleticism. Injuries: Review: (1/06) Anthony Johnson is a very fundamentally sound receiver, he’s average in every definition of the word. Good at everything but great at nothing, Johnson plays a very similar game to Jordan Matthews. While Johnson was able to excel in the MAC, totaling 25 touchdowns in two years, his subpar athleticism is a little concerning when talking about transitioning to the next level. Johnson has below average speed and lacks the quickness and burst to create easy separation from his defender. Aside from Johnson’s athleticism, he has an extremely well-rounded game. He has good choppy footwork that gives him clean breaks in his routes which is a necessity considering his lack of burst. Combining these clean breaks with his strong and reliable hands makes Johnson a trustworthy receiver and a plausible bail out option when the quarterback is under pressure. Possibly the most impressive aspect of Johnson’s game is his ability to create after the catch. He has great balance and strength thus making it hard for smaller defensive backs to tackle him. It’s hard to gauge Johnson’s style of play as a non power five receiver. His lack of athleticism could ruin his transition to the NFL, or his well-rounded game could make him an average starter. It’s more tempting to take a receiver like Parris Campbell who has exceptional athletic ability and try to coach the rest of his game, than an Anthony Johnson with mediocre athleticism and hope that his game will elevate enough to make up for his athleticism. Grade: 7.3 Tier: Potential Starter Draft Stock: Day Two - Day Three Game Films: Temple (2018), Bowling Green (2017), WR - DK Metcalf - Ole Miss 6’4” - 230 Lbs. - RS Sophomore Pros: Release. Separation. Athleticism. Catch radius. Vertical speed. Size. Cons: Limited route tree. Production. Hands. Injuries: Broken foot 2016. Neck surgery 2018. Review: (12/14) DK Metcalf is a dazzling highlight reel when he’s on the field, his all-around athletic ability makes him a physical specimen. However, the only intangible receiving talent that Metcalf shows as a receiver is his release off the line and ability to create separation. Other than that, Metcalf has subpar hands, an inexperienced route tree and a full injury history. A broken foot in 2016 and a neck surgery in 2018 make Metcalf’s health very questionable and a high risk. Grade: 7.2 Tier: Potential Starter Draft Stock: Day Two - Day Three Game Films: Alabama (2018), LSU (2018), Texas Tech (2018), WR - Riley Ridley - Georgia 6’1” - 200 Lbs. - Junior Pros: Footwork. Release. Route running. Strong hands. Attacks the ball. Strong hands. Catch radius. Cons: Acceleration. Production. Stutter steps. Downfield blocking. Injuries: 2016 foot surgery. Review: (1/7) The footwork and route running that Riley Ridley shows at the peak of his game is something to pay attention too. This will be the selling point for Ridley throughout the draft process. He doesn’t show any exceptional talent or athleticism to make him an enticing draft pick, but his sharp breaks and cuts are a point to build on. He shows the ability to release off the line well and a step past his defender cleanly. After Ridley is open, he has strong hands on his catches and a large catch radius showing that he can adjust his body to the ball. There’s an inconsistency and a lack of athleticism to Ridley’s game that is going to hold his draft stock back. He shows no real speed or acceleration to be able to pull away from opposing defensive backs, and his inconsistency within his production and game speed is a real concern. At his peak, Ridley looks to be able to develop into a viable option on the field, however, at his floor, Ridley isn’t going to see playing time because his inconsistency and his wavering route running won’t be enough to put him on the field. Grade: 7.2 Tier: Potential Starter Draft Stock: Day Two - Day Three Game Films: LSU (2018), Missouri (2018), Alabama (2017), WR - Marqise Brown - Oklahoma 5’11” - 170 Lbs. - Junior Pros: Vertical speed. Acceleration. Footwork. Run after catch. Separation. Ball tracking. Shifty. Cons: Size. Inconsistent hands. Strength. Injuries: Review: (12/21/2018) Marqise Brown has some of the highest boom or bust potential in the draft class, come April he will be one of the most polarizing prospects there is. His explosiveness makes him look to translate as quite the gadget weapon, but gadgets don’t always work out. Brown has lightning fast acceleration and speed that allows him to disappear in the open field. Despite a small route tree, his footwork gives the impression that he’ll be able to run NFL level routes. While Brown shows inconsistent hands, his ability to track the ball is exceptional. A lack of size is going to severely take away from Brown’s talent and could make the transition to the NFL a real challenge. Grade: 7.2 Tier: Potential Starter Draft Stock: Day Two - Day Three Game Films: Texas (2018), West Virginia (2018), WR - Collin Johnson - Texas 6’5” - 220 Lbs. - Junior Pros: Size. Downfield blocking. Ball tracking. Body control. Ball adjustments. High points the ball. Cons: Limited route tree. Quickness. Agility. Release. Footwork. Rounded routes. Injuries: Review: (1/04) Unfortunately for those that fanboy the massive size and body frame, Collin Johnson doesn’t project to be much more than a big bodied, high effort player. Johnson’s 6’5” size along with a good habit to get up and high point the football makes him a tremendous red zone threat. He shows a knack to locate the ball and have the body control to position himself for it and the adjustments to make a play. Johnson doesn’t have the athleticism to make him a consistent threat on every down. He lacks the necessary burst and quickness to pull away from defenders as well as the vertical speed to be a deep threat. Poor footwork combined with subpar athleticism kills any chance for Johnson to create separation. It’s unlikely for Johnson to translate well too the next level, but his ability in the red zone will buy him time to try and develop into a consistently reliable receiver. Improved footwork would provide the biggest jump to his game. Grade: 6.9 Tier: Potential Starter Draft Stock: Day Three Game Films: Maryland (2018), USC (2018),
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