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Eric Clapton - Old Love


TSNBDSC
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31 minutes ago, TSNBDSC said:

 

 

Years ago my wife struck up a close friendship with the wife of a famous musician thru a fundraiser they both worked on. As they got close we began getting invited to a lot of dinners with them and their musician friends. These are R&R HOF folks, and we were accepted because we didn’t know squat and didn’t treat them like hot stuff. Dinners were usually at our houses because it was hard to go out unless you rented private rooms. 

 

Anyway, the Clapton precision of this clip reminded me on one conversation. One guy was talking about recording with Clapton in the Miami area. I asked what album, and he had no idea! He still remembered the music, but he had zero idea about the commercial side. 

 

He said each artist was different. Neil Young would send you the music and say “but you do it the way you feel it”.  Clapton would send the music, and you hit every single note EXACTLY as it was laid out for you. No exceptions. I found the variety of approaches interesting. Good times!!! 

 

 

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One of my all-time favorite Clapton moments is from the 2005 Royal Albert Hall concert with Cream.

 

As the band walks out onto the stage to perform Sunshine of Your Love, Clapton is just noodling around on his Strat basically warming up his hands.

 

Jack Bruce does sort of the same thing on his bass.

 

I've been playing the guitar now for about 10 years and I wouldn't be able to noodle around like that with that exact style to save my life.  LOL.  And he was just playing around on his guitar while walking onto the stage.

 

Here it is:

 

 

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On 3/31/2021 at 12:29 PM, Nextmanup said:

One of my all-time favorite Clapton moments is from the 2005 Royal Albert Hall concert with Cream.

 

As the band walks out onto the stage to perform Sunshine of Your Love, Clapton is just noodling around on his Strat basically warming up his hands.

 

Jack Bruce does sort of the same thing on his bass.

 

I've been playing the guitar now for about 10 years and I wouldn't be able to noodle around like that with that exact style to save my life.  LOL.  And he was just playing around on his guitar while walking onto the stage.

 

Here it is:

 

 

 

Despite the accolades, Jack Bruce is/was a very underrated musician and singer. No less influential than his bandmates, what's-their-names.

 

Ginger Baker was a great drummer but a terrible person. See the very entertaining documentary, "Beware of Mr. Baker"

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8 minutes ago, Max Fischer said:

 

Despite the accolades, Jack Bruce is/was a very underrated musician and singer. No less influential than his bandmates, what's-their-names.

 

Ginger Baker was a great drummer but a terrible person. See the very entertaining documentary, "Beware of Mr. Baker"

Oh yes, I've seen Ginger's documentary.  Yeah, he was a real douche bag but he was also one of the very best rock drummers of all time, largely because he wasn't just a rock drummer.  He was more of a well rounded drummer who could swing and do jazz too.

 

Jack Bruce was phenomenal!  Note that fretless bass he is rocking in the 2006 RAH concert!  

 

If you watch the video of "Sunshine" from Royal Albert Hall but in 1968 that is on Youtube, you can see the unbelievable talent these 3 guys had in their prime.  They were all over the hill in this 2005 concert, as good as that performance was.

 

The torrid pace of "Sunshine" and the crazy hard stuff each guy was doing in 1968 is really something to behold.

 

I'm a gigantic Zeppelin fan; they are the only band I can think of that can compete with Cream at its peak for raw musicianship.

 

It's literally as good as rock ever got.

 

This is the 1968 version I'm talking about (the introductory narration is absolutely amazing!):

 

 

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Now jumping a few years forward to 1970.  Same venue, Royal Albert Hall.


Zeppelin playing "Dazed and Confused".  This clip shows zeppelin at the absolute height of their powers.  The stuff JPJ, Bonzo, and Page do in this rendition is mind blowing.

 

 

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40 minutes ago, Max Fischer said:

 

Despite the accolades, Jack Bruce is/was a very underrated musician and singer. No less influential than his bandmates, what's-their-names.

 

Ginger Baker was a great drummer but a terrible person. See the very entertaining documentary, "Beware of Mr. Baker"

I've only seen Clapton and Bruce ( not together)... never Ginger. Bruce played at hippiefest at Ruth Eckerd Hall in Clearwater a couple of years before his passing... was Hoping to hear deserted cities of the heart but no. He had sort of a leaning chair that let him stand or sit... and that guy at that age and condition blew the place up, it was beautiful. Melanie didn't have a chance lol.

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38 minutes ago, Nextmanup said:

Oh yes, I've seen Ginger's documentary.  Yeah, he was a real douche bag but he was also one of the very best rock drummers of all time, largely because he wasn't just a rock drummer.  He was more of a well rounded drummer who could swing and do jazz too.

 

Jack Bruce was phenomenal!  Note that fretless bass he is rocking in the 2006 RAH concert!  

 

If you watch the video of "Sunshine" from Royal Albert Hall but in 1968 that is on Youtube, you can see the unbelievable talent these 3 guys had in their prime.  They were all over the hill in this 2005 concert, as good as that performance was.

 

The torrid pace of "Sunshine" and the crazy hard stuff each guy was doing in 1968 is really something to behold.

 

I'm a gigantic Zeppelin fan; they are the only band I can think of that can compete with Cream at its peak for raw musicianship.

 

It's literally as good as rock ever got.

 

This is the 1968 version I'm talking about (the introductory narration is absolutely amazing!):

 

 

 

Few bands we as tight as Cream playing Crossroads. Everyone thinks of Clapton's guitar on that song but it's also for Baker and Bruce's relentless beat that, IMO, makes it a classic. 

 

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