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A question about defensive and offensive line rotation


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Was listening to NFL Radio this morning and they had on a former Giants defensive lineman who now trains NFL defensive line prospects.  He said he trains them to be versatile because of the amount of defensive line rotation that occurs in today's game.  We see that with the Bills and probably every other NFL team.  My question, which I have wondered about for a long time, is why teams do not rotate offensive lineman to keep them fresh?  I know there is the whole thing about chemistry, etc., which doesn't matter when a guy goes down and a replacement comes in.  But it makes me wonder whether having some offensive line rotation to keep guys fresh during the game would help with run blocking, downfield blocking with screens and other short passes, etc.  Does anyone have any insight into why teams don't do this on any regular basis?

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I would guess that being in every play you really get to learn of your opponent's tendency and moves (guy right in front of you). He fools you once early in the game, but now you know what to look for and wont let it happen again type of thing.

 

And, they are starters because they are supposedly better than their backup. Even if tired, a better player at 90% may still be better than their sub at 100%.

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1 minute ago, BuffaloBillies said:

I would guess that being in every play you really get to learn of your opponent's tendency and moves (guy right in front of you). He fools you once early in the game, but now you know what to look for and wont let it happen again type of thing.

 

And, they are starters because they are supposedly better than their backup. Even if tired, a better player at 90% may still be better than their sub at 100%.

I get your first point in terms of pass protection, but even in pass pro you don't always have the same guy lined up over you because of rotations, stunts, blitzes, etc.  On your second point which I've bolded, isn't the same true with defensive linemen, i.e., that the starters are supposedly better than their backups?  

 

I'm really convinced that this all falls into the category of "because that's always the way it's been and that's always the way we've done it", but I would really love to hear the arguments against doing it.

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It's a good question. I suspect it comes down to energy consumption.  It must take less energy to pass block and run block than it does to rush the passer and make a tackle.  Even in the K-gun years, the line didn't get tired. 

Oddly, it is just the opposite for WRs and DBs.   White, Poyer, and Hyde routinely play 100% of the snaps where the top WR's are closer to 70%.

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50 minutes ago, Ethan in Portland said:

It's a good question. I suspect it comes down to energy consumption.  It must take less energy to pass block and run block than it does to rush the passer and make a tackle.  Even in the K-gun years, the line didn't get tired. 

Oddly, it is just the opposite for WRs and DBs.   White, Poyer, and Hyde routinely play 100% of the snaps where the top WR's are closer to 70%.

 

That latter is not quite true.  A typical early-season Bills game would see Diggs and Brown getting 92-95% of the snaps.    A typical later-season Bills game saw Diggs and Davis getting 92-95% of the snaps.  Beasley would get 60-80% and either come out for 2 WR sets, or swap out with McKenzie.

 

3 hours ago, BuffaloBillies said:

I would guess that being in every play you really get to learn of your opponent's tendency and moves (guy right in front of you). He fools you once early in the game, but now you know what to look for and wont let it happen again type of thing.

 

And, they are starters because they are supposedly better than their backup. Even if tired, a better player at 90% may still be better than their sub at 100%.

 

This is one of the things which rotation and movement on the DL is used to surmount.

 

3 hours ago, CuseBill said:

Was listening to NFL Radio this morning and they had on a former Giants defensive lineman who now trains NFL defensive line prospects.  He said he trains them to be versatile because of the amount of defensive line rotation that occurs in today's game.  We see that with the Bills and probably every other NFL team.  My question, which I have wondered about for a long time, is why teams do not rotate offensive lineman to keep them fresh?  I know there is the whole thing about chemistry, etc., which doesn't matter when a guy goes down and a replacement comes in.  But it makes me wonder whether having some offensive line rotation to keep guys fresh during the game would help with run blocking, downfield blocking with screens and other short passes, etc.  Does anyone have any insight into why teams don't do this on any regular basis?

 

I think the reason teams don't do this is because for run blocking, coordination and timing between players on the line is so important.  They all have to move just at the snap, they all have to know how to execute their assignment to support and not interfere with the guy next to them. 

 

It's not to say that timing on the front 7 defenders aren't also important, but it's not (for want of a better word) so ...intimate.  If you just look at a couple of all-22 shots of offensive and defensive formations, I think you'll see what I mean.

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4 hours ago, CuseBill said:

Was listening to NFL Radio this morning and they had on a former Giants defensive lineman who now trains NFL defensive line prospects.  He said he trains them to be versatile because of the amount of defensive line rotation that occurs in today's game.  We see that with the Bills and probably every other NFL team.  My question, which I have wondered about for a long time, is why teams do not rotate offensive lineman to keep them fresh?  I know there is the whole thing about chemistry, etc., which doesn't matter when a guy goes down and a replacement comes in.  But it makes me wonder whether having some offensive line rotation to keep guys fresh during the game would help with run blocking, downfield blocking with screens and other short passes, etc.  Does anyone have any insight into why teams don't do this on any regular basis?


DL is running more. OL is just blocking with upper body strength moving lower body some.  The OL isn’t Thrn chasing the back or re river down field. There is a vast difference in amount running.

 

in buffalo some defense calls has linebacker or dB blitzing, then DL drops for coverage

 

pulling guards snd centers run more so you can see some subs cone in. In hot days you will see some rotation in OL.

 

 

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