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46 minutes ago, 1ManRaid said:

It's almost as if pain is the body's way of saying something is wrong and athletes should just get their injuries actually treated, rather than doping up to play through the pain.

 

Minor aches and pains are a natural part of physical jobs, but if you can't get through a game without surgical grade injections, something is wrong.

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Belichick already has new labels for the Todoral. Problem solved. 

I use Toradol with almost all of my patients, even in cases where we expect or have significant bleeding.  I've never had issue with bleeding.  This a mistake by the NFLPA IMO.  All NSAIDS can theoret

Brady reportedly breathed a sigh of relief when told it was torodol, not midol, that was being banned as he often gets a bit crampy before big games.

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5 hours ago, Limeaid said:

When is the NFLPA going to start recommending the medications allowed for Carpal tunnel syndrome when they replace players on field with virtual players operated by players?

They already have Madden leagues.

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I totally agree with Ross Tuckers take here - interesting after 20+ years of use - you come out with this now with no new major information.  Why?

 

It seems much like the “skipping” of OTAs the NFLPA is giving recommendations about things without merit just to pull players away from teams.  It will be fun when the GMs suddenly use more games and game time missed for players against them as they negotiate contracts.

 

I don’t disagree with the recommendation, but I question the timing and the data behind it.  Without a replacement recommendation that we have not seen - it seems like a big ask of the players by the NFLPA - stop what has been working for you and what has been used by the general public and see what happens.

 

To me it reads like a typical NFLPA response to something they lost and are now trying to gain leverage on.  Moving to 17 games - we are going to try to ban a pain killer and make it look like the number of games missed shot way up and then we will blame the added game.  

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Brady reportedly breathed a sigh of relief when told it was torodol, not midol, that was being banned as he often gets a bit crampy before big games.

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1 hour ago, Rochesterfan said:

I totally agree with Ross Tuckers take here - interesting after 20+ years of use - you come out with this now with no new major information.  Why?

 

It seems much like the “skipping” of OTAs the NFLPA is giving recommendations about things without merit just to pull players away from teams.  It will be fun when the GMs suddenly use more games and game time missed for players against them as they negotiate contracts.

 

I don’t disagree with the recommendation, but I question the timing and the data behind it.  Without a replacement recommendation that we have not seen - it seems like a big ask of the players by the NFLPA - stop what has been working for you and what has been used by the general public and see what happens.

 

To me it reads like a typical NFLPA response to something they lost and are now trying to gain leverage on.  Moving to 17 games - we are going to try to ban a pain killer and make it look like the number of games missed shot way up and then we will blame the added game.  

Is it possible that this is a case of CYA?  Is this the NFL and NFLPA trying to prevent future lawsuits from players who sustain bleeding disorders, saying "We told you not to use it."?

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The question is how they define “anticipated pain”. Sounds to me like they’re saying you shouldn’t get a shot to prevent developing pain, not preventing it from being used to treat existing pain.
 

Basically like saying don’t take a handful of ibuprofen before you start drinking to try and prevent a hangover. 

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Posted (edited)

image.png.db728532e70a5001ee6bdfbb89577312.png

 

“I don’t know if I needed it after awhile, but you come to a point where you go into a game, and if you’ve had an injury, and I had that blown ACL, I figured it was going to hurt a lot during the game, so I went and took it anyways. The worst part about it is when you finally get home after the game. You get home and you want to drink a beer or something and you stand up and you’re like, ‘Oh my gosh, I’m really hurting now.’ When that stuff wears off, you realize how much it can mask the pain.”

 

https://chicago.cbslocal.com/2012/01/26/bowen-on-toradol-masks-a-lot-of-pain/

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There's a pretty significant difference between "should not" and "shall not" -- words matter.  This sounds like best practices/guidelines but not a strict ban.

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6 hours ago, Rochesterfan said:

I totally agree with Ross Tuckers take here - interesting after 20+ years of use - you come out with this now with no new major information.  Why?

 

It seems much like the “skipping” of OTAs the NFLPA is giving recommendations about things without merit just to pull players away from teams.  It will be fun when the GMs suddenly use more games and game time missed for players against them as they negotiate contracts.

 

I don’t disagree with the recommendation, but I question the timing and the data behind it.  Without a replacement recommendation that we have not seen - it seems like a big ask of the players by the NFLPA - stop what has been working for you and what has been used by the general public and see what happens.

 

To me it reads like a typical NFLPA response to something they lost and are now trying to gain leverage on.  Moving to 17 games - we are going to try to ban a pain killer and make it look like the number of games missed shot way up and then we will blame the added game.  

 

Interesting points.

 

I think it's telling that the memo references "recommendations made in 2012 by the NFL Physicians Society Task Force on the Use of Toradol".  My first reaction was "if that report came out in 2012, What Took You So Long?"

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4 hours ago, transient said:

The question is how they define “anticipated pain”. Sounds to me like they’re saying you shouldn’t get a shot to prevent developing pain, not preventing it from being used to treat existing pain.
 

Basically like saying don’t take a handful of ibuprofen before you start drinking to try and prevent a hangover. 

 

No, not quite like that.  It's like someone like Cole Beasley, playing on a broken leg.  He's been working out on a zero-gravity treadmill if at all and limited in practice - maybe not cutting or reversing direction.  Now he wants to go out and play normally with his usual sharp cuts and direction reverses.    It's not a structural injury, so it's possible to play but it's gonna hurt like hell.  So he hops on the "T-train" for his toradol injection and plays.


Or like Harrison Phillips, who was quoted recently saying

Quote

"By last season, Phillips was back on the field, but players usually aren’t fully fit until two years after that injury. For Phillips, that’ll be 2021 and already early on this offseason, the 25-year-old is feeling much better.

“I could not do a run or an activity without significant eight-out-of-10, seven-out-of-10 pain,” Phillips said via the Buffalo News. “Now, I could sit here and do single-leg jumps for an hour and I won’t feel any pain. It’s like night and day.”

 

It would be a pretty good bet he was getting toradol to deal with that 8 out of 10 pain and play anyway.

 

It's guys who have an injury or are recovering from an injury, but still have significant pain that they know will hamper them on Sunday.

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14 hours ago, BfloBillsFan said:

I use Toradol with almost all of my patients, even in cases where we expect or have significant bleeding.  I've never had issue with bleeding.  This a mistake by the NFLPA IMO.  All NSAIDS can theoretically increase the bleeding.  Hope marijuana has been approved for the players pain because that's about all they have left.

 

Sorry to prove my ignorance, but can you give me some detail on this? What kind of bleeding are we talking about? External, like it thins the blood and prevents clotting? Or does it cause some risk of internal bleeding? I appreciate your knowledge in advance, BBF.

 

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I’ve worked in the ER for 24 years and I use Toradol (ketorolac) daily. You can put it through an IV, use it in a shot, there’s a pill, and there’s even an eye drop for inflamed eyes.

 

There is a theoretical risk of increased bleeding with any medicine related to aspirin, which Toradol is.  I think the risk of bleeding is very small.  The major benefit is that almost every other pain medicine we have is a narcotic, and obviously regular opiate use opens the door to possible addiction issues.

 

Toradol is the best non-narcotic pain medicine we have.  Bruce Smith said playing in the NFL was like being in a car wreck every Sunday.  These players are going to take something for their pain.  Looking at the big picture, if it were me, I’d choose the theoretical risk of more bruises or bleeding with Toradol over the very real risk of addiction with opiates.

 

 

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1 minute ago, BornAgainBillsFan said:

 

Sorry to prove my ignorance, but can you give me some detail on this? What kind of bleeding are we talking about? External, like it thins the blood and prevents clotting? Or does it cause some risk of internal bleeding? I appreciate your knowledge in advance, BBF.

 

Aspirin works by stopping the platelets in our blood from sticking together and starting to form a clot to stop bleeding when an injury occurs.  Theoretically Toradol could do the same. I think the risk of bleeding is very small with taking aspirin or Toradol.

 

Coumadin, Eliquis, Xarelto, Lovenox are what most people call a blood thinner, and also Plavix to a lesser extent.  Plavix works on platelets too, more so than aspirin does.   The others work by interfering with the liver making coagulation factors that help stop bleeding.  They are very strong medicines and you will bleed more even with minor injuries if you are taking these medicines.  Playing football on any of these meds would be life threatening.

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34 minutes ago, mattynh said:

The tweet looks more like an advisory to me vs a ban....but then again its just a tweet.

 

There is a reason it is called TWITter.

 

 

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15 hours ago, Dr. Football said:

And Tom Brady just announced his retirement from the NFL! 😂😂😂

Nah, he has a special type of kale for that.

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45 minutes ago, Inigo Montoya said:

These players are going to take something for their pain.  Looking at the big picture, if it were me, I’d choose the theoretical risk of more bruises or bleeding with Toradol over the very real risk of addiction with opiates.

Indeed. You have to find the "lesser evil" as you just know players will take something.

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